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Author makes readers care about boys about to become men

"Nothing More Dangerous," Mulholland, by Allen Eskens Nothing is more dangerous, says one character quoting the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., than "sheer ignorance." That danger can b...

Review: 'Curious Toys' has deliciously creepy setting

"Curious Toys," Little, Brown and Co., by Elizabeth Hand An amusement park with its odd corners, dark mysterious rides, nefarious-looking characters and garish lighting makes for a d...

Cha's story is about race, redemption and forgiveness

"Your House Will Pay: a Novel," Ecco, by Steph Cha The "house" in Steph Cha's riveting first stand-alone novel references many types of houses. There is the home in which you live, b...

Review: 'The Liar' makes a good case for telling the truth

"The Liar," Little Brown and Co., by Ayelet Gundar-Goshen As expected in a novel titled "The Liar," lies abound in this engaging story that is part mystery and part coming-of-age tal...

Race, family and history converge in 'Heaven, My Home'

"Heaven, My Home" (Mulholland), by Attica Locke Race, family and history converge in Attica Locke's second intense novel about African American Texas Ranger Darren Mathews. In this n...

Author doles out clues in the character-driven 'The Nanny'

"The Nanny" (William Morrow), by Gilly Macmillan Classism, fragile memories and a family torn apart by misunderstandings and jealousy haunt an aristocratic British family in "The Nan...

'The Perfect Wife' has intriguing plot, chilling finale

"The Perfect Wife" (Ballantine Books), by JP Delaney Some couples seem to be perfect for each other, but can any relationship achieve perfection? Silicon Valley ent...

Review: 'The Escape Room' looks at the dark side of ambition

"The Escape Room: a Novel" (St. Martin's Press), by Megan Goldin Team building exercises meant to foster cooperation, loyalty and critical thinking are often just an irritating waste...

Review: Laura Lippman's new stand-alone novel is superb

"Lady in the Lake" (William Morrow), by Laura Lippman Everyone wants to feel that he or she has an impact on the world or to have just one other person believe — no, know — that what...

Review: Alison Gaylin probes how violence affects families

"Never Look Back" by Alison Gaylin (William Morrow) The popularity of true crime podcasts bleeds into the tightly plotted "Never Look Back" by Alison Gaylin. Her fictional hero Quent...

Review: A house sitter becomes a target in 'Lock Every Door'

"Lock Every Door" by Riley Sager (Dutton) A historical New York City apartment building complete with wealthy celebrity residents, gargoyles and a storied legacy including the settin...

Review: A rich mystery awaits in S.J. Rozan's 'Paper Son'

"Paper Son" by S.J. Rozan (Pegasus Books) S.J. Rozan's affinity for little known facts about Chinese culture has fueled exciting thrillers featuring private detectives Lydia Chin and...

Perceptive plot fuels emotional 'Her Daughter's Mother'

"Her Daughter's Mother: a Novel" (Putnam), by Daniela Petrova For some couples, the plan to have a child becomes an all-consuming quest when they are faced with infertility issues. T...

Review: Love your neighbor? Not in Louise Candlish's novel

"Those People" by Louise Candlish (Berkley) Oh, those people_those boorish, inconsiderate people who move into a nice, quiet neighborhood and have no respect for those who live there...

Author forcefully builds the tension in 'Those People'

"Those People" (Berkley), by Louise Candlish Oh, those people — those boorish, inconsiderate people who move into a nice quiet neighborhood and have no respect for those who live the...