AP EXPLAINS: Science of uranium enrichment amid Iran tension

NEW YORK (AP) — Iran made a veiled threat this week to enrich uranium stocks closer to weapon-grade levels amid rising tensions in the region. That would mean going beyond the level ...

'Zombie cells' buildup in your body may play role in aging

NEW YORK (AP) — Call them zombie cells — they refuse to die. As they build up in your body, studies suggest, they promote aging and the conditions that come with it like osteoporosis...

Chinese fossil sheds light on mysterious Neanderthal kin

NEW YORK (AP) — Nearly 40 years after it was found by a monk in a Chinese cave, a fossilized chunk of jawbone has been revealed as coming from a mysterious relative of the Neanderthals. ...

Study: Genetic test predicts middle-aged obesity risk

NEW YORK (AP) — Can a genetic test identify newborns at risk of becoming severely obese by middle age? Researchers say they have come up with one, and that it might allow interventions in childhood to...

Scientists spur some activity in brains of slaughtered pigs

NEW YORK (AP) — Scientists restored some activity within the brains of pigs that had been slaughtered hours before, raising hopes for some medical advances and questions about the definition of death....

Celeb or stranger? Study weighs Americans' interest in birds

NEW YORK (AP) — How interested are Americans in different kinds of birds? A new study used Google searches to find out. Whooping cranes, common ravens and peregrine falcons were deem...

Bones from Philippines cave reveal a new human cousin

NEW YORK (AP) — Fossil bones and teeth found in the Philippines have revealed a long-lost cousin of modern people, which evidently lived around the time our own species was spreading from Africa...

Brain zaps boost memory in people over 60, study finds

NEW YORK (AP) — Zapping the brains of people over 60 with a mild electrical current improved a form of memory enough that they performed like people in their 20s, a new study found. ...

Meow hear this: Study says cats react to sound of their name

NEW YORK (AP) — Hey Kitty! Yes, you. A new study suggests household cats can respond to the sound of their own names. No surprise to you or most cat owners, right? But Japanese scien...

NASA's plan to scoop up dirt from asteroid hits a snag

NEW YORK (AP) — NASA's plan to scoop up dirt and gravel from an asteroid has hit a snag. Scientists thought the asteroid Bennu had wide, open areas suitable for the task. But a space...

Scientists back temporary global ban on gene-edited babies

NEW YORK (AP) — An international group of scientists and ethicists on Wednesday called for a temporary global ban on making babies with edited genes. It's the latest reaction to last...

New techniques let scientists zero in on individual cells

NEW YORK (AP) — Did you hear what happened when Bill Gates walked into a bar? Everybody there immediately became millionaires — on average. That joke about a very rich man is an old ...

Fish pass mirror test, but does it mean they're self-aware?

NEW YORK (AP) — Scientists report that a fish can pass a standard test of recognizing itself in a mirror, but they are questioning just what that means. The test was designed to show self-awareness in...

Lab revokes honors for controversial scientist James Watson

NEW YORK (AP) — James Watson, the Nobel Prize-winning DNA scientist who lost his job in 2007 for expressing racist views, was stripped of several honorary titles Friday by the New York lab he once hea...

2 technicians killed at Antarctica science station

NEW YORK (AP) — The National Science Foundation says two technicians working on a fire-suppression system at an Antarctica scientific station were found unconscious and died. The fou...