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Top German court rules in favor of EU treaty

 Andreas Vosskuhle, presiding judge, announces the  second senate's sentence in Karlsruhe, southern Germany, Tuesday, June 30, 2009. Germany's highest...

Germany EU Treaty

Andreas Vosskuhle, presiding judge, announces the second senate's sentence in Karlsruhe, southern Germany, Tuesday, June 30, 2009. Germany's highest...

Germany's highest court on Tuesday cleared the way for the country to complete ratification of the European Union's reform treaty, rejecting complaints that it hands too much power to Brussels.
The ruling by the Federal Constitutional Court means that the Lisbon Treaty remains on track. German President Horst Koehler had held off signing it into law while the court considered the case.
The treaty still faces one awkward hurdle: It will now go to Irish voters, who are due to hold a new referendum in October after they rejected it last year _ throwing years of EU diplomacy into doubt.
Germany's highest court, meeting in Karlsruhe, rejected complaints by conservative lawmaker Peter Gauweiler and the opposition Left Party that the treaty, meant to streamline how the 27-nation EU is run and bolster its role on the world stage, violates the German constitution.
In its ruling, the court found that "the substance of German state authority is protected" in the treaty. It said any decisions on transferring powers to the EU will be made "in a controlled and responsible manner."
The judges did, however, find fault with an accompanying law drawn up by the German government on the rights of the parliament in Berlin.
Those rights "have not been elaborated to the constitutionally required extent" and that needs to be cleared up before ratification is completed, their ruling said.
Germany's constitution "says yes to the Lisbon Treaty but calls at national level for a strengthening of parliamentary responsibility," presiding judge Andreas Vosskuhle said in his nationally televised verdict.
The court "is confident that the last hurdle ... will be cleared quickly," he added.
Norbert Roettgen, a senior lawmaker with Chancellor Angela Merkel's Christian Democrats, said a vote on an amended law could be expected before Germany's Sept. 27 election.


Updated : 2021-04-14 16:43 GMT+08:00