Alexa
  • Directory of Taiwan

SAfrican clubs hoping to benefit from Confed Cup

SAfrican clubs hoping to benefit from Confed Cup

While the Confederations Cup has given South Africa a clearer picture of the state of its national team and readiness to host next year's World Cup, the situation facing its clubs is foggier.
A 16-team league closely modeled on England's lucrative Premier League means the South African game is richer and at arguably its highest ever standard, but the legacy of the apartheid era and cultural attitudes still prevent the sport from reaching its full potential.
The relationship between money and football is a complex one at the best of times and perhaps even more so in South Africa.
Premier League Soccer's monthly retainer and the appearance fee paid to teams for each televised match allows clubs to give players better salaries. But a taste of success and the lure of the even more lucrative contracts on offer from top European sides means even powerhouse clubs Kaizer Chiefs and Orlando Pirates struggle to keep top players in the country.
"We've got to start people playing for the pride of the nation, make them understand the responsibility they have," Moroka Swallows interim coach Zeca Marques said. "One of the drawbacks in South African football is that it's money-driven. We all are, but I always say if you're money driven and you're in sport, you're in the wrong business.
"It's a question of time. It's a culture that's entrenched. When you come from a poverty background, you'll be even more money driven, but that's understandable. When you don't have money, you want to chase money."
Backed by mining magnate Patrice Motsepe, the Mamelodi Sundowns reputedly pay players as much as 200,000 rand ($25,292;


Updated : 2021-05-17 09:46 GMT+08:00