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Judge: C-Murder can stay under house arrest

Judge: C-Murder can stay under house arrest

A judge warned Corey "C-Murder" Miller Tuesday that he's "walking a tightrope" but denied a request by prosecutors to send the rapper back to jail until his August trial on a second-degree murder charge.
State District Judge Hans Liljeberg rejected prosecutors' motion to revoke Miller's $1 million bond at the hearing that also made plain the rapper's financial problems. Liljeberg warned Miller it would not take much to put him back in jail.
"You're walking a tightrope right now, and I don't think you've fallen off the wrong side," Liljeberg said. "But you're wobbling."
Miller, 38, is accused of killing Steve Thomas, 16, during a brawl in a Harvey nightclub on Jan. 22, 2002. Miller's original conviction in the slaying was overturned after a judge ruled that prosecutors withheld information about witnesses. If convicted of the charge at his retrial scheduled for Aug. 3, Miller faces a mandatory life sentence in prison.
Prosecutors sought to end Miller's house arrest with motions claiming he violated a gag order by proclaiming his innocence on a Web site and abused the terms of his home incarceration by having a felon attend a news conference outside the house where he's staying.
Prosecutors argued that the presence of Rev. Toris Young, who has pleaded guilty to identity theft, outside Miller's grandmother's house constituted association with a criminal. However, Young testified that he was not on Miller's property during the news conference, that he and Miller did not know each other and that they did not talk.
The second issue for prosecutors was a Web site launched to help raise money for Miller's defense. The site includes a letter, which once bore Miller's name, discussing the seven-year effort to prove his innocence and his need for money.
On Tuesday, freelance writer Brandy Clementin testified that she wrote the letter from Miller's point of view, but had never met Miller or discussed the content with him. The Web site has been modified to say, "Composed by Lady B."
Miller said he had received only one check in response to the plea.
Miller's need for money was obvious Tuesday when his attorney Ron Rakosky pleaded with the judge to be allowed to withdraw from the case, saying Miller has not paid him in three years.
"I don't want to withdraw from this case, but I've worked without compensation for three years," Rakosky said. "Not without substantial compensation, without any compensation."
Liljeberg refused Rakosky's request, saying he doesn't want a change in attorneys to delay the trial.
"Me personally," Liljeberg told Miller, "I'd feel a lot better going to trial if my lawyer was paid."
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http://www.coreymillerinnocencefund.com/


Updated : 2021-04-19 03:04 GMT+08:00