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Nepal's president asks parties to form new gov't

 Policemen guard the Parliament building where elected members hold a meeting in Katmandu, Nepal, Tuesday, May 5, 2009. Nepal's political parties held...
 An elderly man walks past policemen standing guard in front of President Ram Baran Yadav's office, in Katmandu, Nepal, Tuesday, May 5, 2009. Nepal's ...
 Policemen stand guard in front of President Ram Baran Yadav's office, in Katmandu, Nepal, Tuesday, May 5, 2009. Nepal's political parties held crisis...
 Nepal's soldiers stand guard at the entrance of the "Singha Durbar," where all official offices of political Parties and army barracks are located, i...

Nepal

Policemen guard the Parliament building where elected members hold a meeting in Katmandu, Nepal, Tuesday, May 5, 2009. Nepal's political parties held...

Nepal

An elderly man walks past policemen standing guard in front of President Ram Baran Yadav's office, in Katmandu, Nepal, Tuesday, May 5, 2009. Nepal's ...

Nepal

Policemen stand guard in front of President Ram Baran Yadav's office, in Katmandu, Nepal, Tuesday, May 5, 2009. Nepal's political parties held crisis...

Nepal

Nepal's soldiers stand guard at the entrance of the "Singha Durbar," where all official offices of political Parties and army barracks are located, i...

Nepal's president Tuesday asked political parties to stake their claims to form a new government after the prime minister, a former leader of Maoist rebels, resigned.
Parties held emergency talks on setting up a new coalition government after Prime Minister Pushpa Kamal Dahal's sudden resignation Monday plunged this Himalayan nation into political crisis.
Nepal only emerged in 2006 from a decade of civil war that claiming thousands of lives.
Dahal, also known by his nom de guerre, "Prachanda," or "the fierce one," stood down in a dispute with President Ram Baran Yadav over firing the country's military chief. Dahal wanted him fired because of his refusal to enlist former Maoist rebels into the military, but Yadav overruled that decision.
Tens of thousands of opposing demonstrators took to the streets Monday, but the situation was calmer Tuesday.
Hundreds of police were deployed around the president's office and detained about 40 protesters who rallied there in violation of a ban against protests in some sensitive areas of the city, police official Govind Pathak said.
Yadav formally asked political parties to form a new government. A statement issued by the president's office said parties have until Saturday to come forward and stake their claims.
Dahal's Communist Party of Nepal (Maoist) is the largest party in parliament but it does not have a clear majority. His resignation pulled his party out of the ruling coalition and collapsed the government.
His former coalition partners now appear most likely to team up against him.
The political parties huddled on Tuesday in Katmandu. Nepali Congress, the second largest party after the Maoists _ which is also Yadav's party _ pledged their support to Communist Party of Nepal (United Marxist Leninist), the third biggest party, said Ram Sharan Mahat of the Nepali Congress.
These parties would still need the support of other parties to form the new government.
More unrest appears likely. The Maoists have vowed to launch demonstrations and shut down the parliament in protest of the president's actions.
The Maoists fought a bloody 10-year war before joining the political mainstream. They won the most votes during parliamentary elections last year and then abolished the centuries-old monarchy.
Many of the movement's fighters remain confined to U.N.-monitored barracks. Under a peace accord brokered by the world body, they are meant to be integrated into the military.
In his resignation speech, Dahal accused Yadav of "a fatal attack on the infant democracy." He claimed the president had no power to act as he did without the prior approval of Cabinet.
"The unconstitutional and undemocratic move by the president has pushed the country toward a serious political crisis," Dahal said.
However, Dahal's own decision to fire army chief Rookmangud Katawal, who had resisted the enlistment of former rebels into the military, provoked a revolt in Dahal's coalition prompting his resignation as prime minister.


Updated : 2021-04-15 19:25 GMT+08:00