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China's foreign minister warns U.S. on Taiwan

 China's Foreign Minister Yang Jiechi speaks to the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) in Washington, Thursday, March 12, 2009. (AP...

US China

China's Foreign Minister Yang Jiechi speaks to the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) in Washington, Thursday, March 12, 2009. (AP...

China's foreign minister Thursday warned the U.S. on Taiwan, saying that Beijing will never compromise despite easing cross-strait tensions.

Foreign Minister Yang Jiechi (楊潔箎) issued his warning in a speech in Washington, where he nonetheless called for greater cooperation with President Barack Obama's administration despite recent rows.

"I want to stress that no matter how the situation across the Taiwan Strait may evolve, we will never waiver in our commitment to the one China principle and will never compromise our opposition to 'Taiwan independence,' 'two Chinas' or 'one China, one Taiwan,'" he said.

"We hope that the U.S. side will honor its commitments, prudently and properly handle Taiwan-related issues, and take concrete actions to support the peaceful development of cross-strait relations," he said.

Yang was speaking at the Center for Strategic and International Studies at a closed-door luncheon before his meeting with Obama.

The think tank later released footage of the event, which wasn't publicly announced beforehand.

China considers Taiwan - where nationalists fled in 1949 after losing the mainland's civil war - to be a province awaiting reunification, by force if necessary.

Relations have eased dramatically since the island last year elected President Ma Ying-jeou (馬英九), who has pledged to nurture cross-strait trade and avoid confrontation with Beijing.

Yang said China would continue efforts to "bring about new progress in the peaceful development of cross-strait relations."

The U.S. in 1979 severed relations with Taiwan when it recognized Beijing as China's only legitimate government.

However, the U.S. Congress at the same time approved a law requiring the U.S. to retain the capability to defend Taiwan's security and provide it with "arms of a defensive character."

China has strongly opposed U.S. military sales to Taiwan.


Updated : 2021-12-03 10:16 GMT+08:00