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'Clark Rockefeller' to get more gold coins back

'Clark Rockefeller' to get more gold coins back

The man who calls himself Clark Rockefeller will get more of his gold coins back to help pay for his defense in the kidnapping of his 7-year-old daughter.
Prosecutors have agreed to return another 50 gold coins, in addition to 160 coins that have already been returned. Each of the one-ounce coins is worth between $900 and $1,000.
Rockefeller's real name is Christian Karl Gerhartsreiter, (GAYR'-hahrtz-ry-tur), a German national who authorities say has been living under various aliases since moving to the United States in the 1970s.
Jake Wark, a spokesman for Suffolk District Attorney Dan Conley, said Wednesday that prosecutors will keep the rest of the coins, which were seized by authorities when Gerhartsreither was arrested.
"It was a decision reached mutually that will him to continue to pay for his defense while providing us evidence to present at trial," Wark said.
Gerhartsreiter, 47, is accused of snatching his daughter during a supervised visit in Boston in July. They were found in Baltimore six days later after an international manhunt.
Authorities seized 321 gold coins and nearly $13,000 in cash. In December, prosecutors agreed to return half of the coins and cash, acknowledging that Gerhartsreiter had obtained the money legally.
At the time, Assistant District Attorney David Deakin said authorities planned to keep some of the coins to use during Gerhartsreiter's trial because prosecutors consider them evidence that he planned the kidnapping.
Authorities say Gerhartsreiter bought the coins after receiving a divorce settlement from his ex-wife in December 2007.
After investigators determined his true identity, authorities labeled him as a "person of interest" in the 1985 disappearance of a San Marino, Calif., couple, Jonathan and Linda Sohus. Gerhartsreiter, who then went by the name Chris Chichester, was living in a guest house on their property when they disappeared.
Gerhartsreiter's lawyers have said they will use an insanity defense in the kidnapping case. On Friday, they are expected to file court papers disclosing the mental condition they will cite during his trial.
Tim Bradl, one of his attorneys, would not comment on Gerhartsreiter's diagnosis.
"We are leaving it in the hands of the doctors right now," Bradl said.


Updated : 2020-12-01 13:37 GMT+08:00