Alexa
  • Directory of Taiwan

UN chief to share concerns with Congress

 National Security Adviser James Jones talks with Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton inside the Oval Office of the White House while President ...
 President Barack Obama meets with United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, Tuesday, March 10...

Obama UN

National Security Adviser James Jones talks with Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton inside the Oval Office of the White House while President ...

Obama UN

President Barack Obama meets with United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, Tuesday, March 10...

Buoyed by President Barack Obama's pledge to work closely on bringing peace for Darfur, the U.N. chief is making the rounds of Capitol Hill to strengthen cooperation on climate change and other pressing global crises.
Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon was to meet with Rep. Howard Berman, the House Foreign Relations chairman, Wednesday morning and with Sen. John Kerry, chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, in the afternoon.
Climate change was expected to dominate Ban's meetings. There also has been interest in Congress about Sudan and the way the United Nations conducts its investigation into Israel's bombing of a U.N. compound in Gaza City.
Ban, who became secretary-general in January 2007, accepted Obama's invitation for a White House meeting Tuesday. At the meeting, Obama declared that the violence in Darfur and inaction in the face of its worsening humanitarian crisis are "not acceptable." The president pledged to work more closely with the United Nations to bring peace to western Sudan's conflict-wracked region.
His comments were the strongest to date on the situation in Darfur since Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir kicked out 13 aid groups after the International Criminal Court issued a warrant for his arrest on charges of war crimes and crimes against humanity.
Ban, in turn, told Obama that 2009 is a "make-or-break" year for the organization and its member countries and that he hopes the United States will work with the international organization to address global warming and the humanitarian crisis in Darfur.
Ban's top priority this year is to encourage global leaders to adopt a new international climate treaty at a conference in December in Copenhagen.
"It's the beginning of the establishment of a close relationship between the two," said Peter Yeo, a vice president for the U.N. Foundation launched by media mogul Ted Turner's $1 billion donation in 1997.
Yeo, a former House Democratic staffer and foreign policy adviser to both the Obama and Clinton campaigns last year, said Obama's budget proposal also is a hopeful sign for the U.S.-U.N. relationship.
The United States has agreed as usual to pay nearly a quarter of the U.N.'s $4.86 billion operating budget, but is perennially late with its dues.
Now, Obama is seeking a 9.5 percent increase in international affairs spending, which would be enough to cover not only next year's U.S. dues to the U.N. but also the nearly $1 billion in arrears the U.S. owes the organization.


Updated : 2021-04-22 08:02 GMT+08:00