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Sri Lanka tightens security after suicide blast

 This image made from video shows an explosion in background, as Sri Lankan Muslim men perform during a religious procession in Akuressa, in Matara, a...
 A Sri Lankan police officer looks at the wreckage of motorcycles and dead bodies, covered with green color clothes at an explosion site in Akuressa, ...
 This image made from video shows an explosion in background, as Sri Lankan Muslim men perform during a religious procession in Akuressa, in Matara, a...

APTOPIX Sri Lanka Civil War

This image made from video shows an explosion in background, as Sri Lankan Muslim men perform during a religious procession in Akuressa, in Matara, a...

Sri Lanka Civil War

A Sri Lankan police officer looks at the wreckage of motorcycles and dead bodies, covered with green color clothes at an explosion site in Akuressa, ...

APTOPIX Sri Lanka Civil War

This image made from video shows an explosion in background, as Sri Lankan Muslim men perform during a religious procession in Akuressa, in Matara, a...

New security measures will be implemented across Sri Lanka in the aftermath a suicide bombing that killed 14 people and critically wounded a government minister, the government said Wednesday.
Media Minister Anura Yapa said the attack, in the southern town of Akuressa, about 100 miles (160 kilometers) south of Colombo, showed that even remote parts of the country far from the civil war raging in the north, were vulnerable to terror attacks.
"No one believed that this kind of attack could take place in a remote area like Akuressa," he said. "Definitely, police will implement new security measures to prevent these kind of attacks."
He did not elaborate on what the new security measures would entail, saying that senior police officials would make those decisions.
The suicide bomber targeted six government ministers as they led a religious procession Tuesday morning. The blast, blamed on the Tamil Tigers, came as government forces battled for the last rebel stronghold in the north and appeared poised to defeat the group after more than 25 years of civil war.
The attack killed 13 people and badly wounded Minister of Posts and Telecommunications Mahinda Wijesekara, who was flown to Colombo for surgery and remained in serious condition Wednesday, according to Dr. Hector Weerasinghe, director of Colombo National Hospital.
No one has claimed responsibility for the blast. But an attack by the Tigers would highlight their capability to strike far from their traditional strongholds in the north and east even as they face battlefield defeat.
Meanwhile, fighting surged in the northern war zone, with the rebels and troops locked in heavy battles in Puthukkudiyiruppu, the last town under rebel control, the military said Wednesday.
Human rights and aid groups have voiced concern for the fate of the tens of thousands of ethnic Tamil civilians trapped in the shrinking sliver of land still under rebel control. Heavy artillery attacks Tuesday killed at least 49 civilians and wounded hundreds, according to the top government health official in the war zone.
The Tamil Tigers have fought since 1983 for an independent state for the Tamil minority, which suffered decades of marginalization at the hands of governments dominated by the Sinhalese majority. More than 70,000 people have been killed.


Updated : 2021-08-05 05:41 GMT+08:00