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Obituaries in the news

Obituaries in the news

Jimmy Boyd
SANTA MONICA, Calif. (AP) _ Jimmy Boyd, the child singer and actor best known for the original rendition of the Christmas novelty hit "I Saw Mommy Kissing Santa Claus" in 1952, died Saturday. He was 70.
Boyd died of cancer at a Santa Monica convalescent hospital, longtime friend Eleanor Pillsbury said Tuesday.
"I Saw Mommy" shot to the top of the Billboard charts three weeks after it was released. It sold 2 million records in less than 10 weeks. It has since been interpreted by such artists as the Jackson 5, John Mellencamp and Amy Winehouse.
Boyd, who was 13 when he recorded the song, told Time magazine soon after its release that he was surprised by its success.
His TV work included appearances on "The Ed Sullivan Show" in the early 1950s and roles in the situation comedies "Bachelor Father" from 1958 to 1961 and "Date with the Angels" in the late-1950s.
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Ralph Mercado
HACKENSACK, N.J. (AP) _ Ralph Mercado, a Brooklyn native whose promotional skills helped spread the popularity of salsa music worldwide, died Tuesday. He was 57.
Mercado died at Hackensack University Medical Center. He was diagnosed with cancer two years ago. His publicist, Blanca Lasalle, confirmed his death.
For more than 30 years, Mercado staged Latin music events in the New York area and managed some of the biggest stars of salsa. He also developed a record label, RMM Records, a publishing company, and a video and film production company, and operated restaurants and nightclubs in New York.
He opened a management, booking and promotions company called Showstoppers, which promoted R&B acts, including James Brown and Aretha Franklin, and New York concerts that featured a fusion of salsa and Latin jazz.
In 1972, Mercado opened RMM Management, representing jazz star Eddie Palmieri and Ray Barretto. He continued to promote Latin dances and concerts, including events featuring the Fania All-Stars, an ensemble of musicians and singers who recorded for Fania Records, the leading salsa record company of the time.
Mercado later started his own independent Latin music recording company, RMM Records. Leading artists who recorded for the label included Marc Anthony, La India, Tito Puente and Celia Cruz.
Mercado was honored with a lifetime achievement tribute by Billboard magazine in 1999.
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Larry Regan
OTTAWA (AP) _ Larry Regan, a former NHL rookie of the year who became the first general manager of the Los Angeles Kings and coached the team for a season, died Monday. He was 78.
He died at the Civic Campus of the Ottawa Hospital, the hospital said Tuesday. He had a number of health problems, including Parkinson's disease.
Regan played five seasons in the NHL with Boston and Toronto. He won the Calder Trophy as the league's top rookie in 1956-57 after finishing with 33 points with the Bruins. At 27 years old, he was one of the oldest Calder winners.
Regan was an excellent skater, stickhandler and penalty-killer who often scored with his team short-handed. In 280 career games, he totaled 41 goals and 95 assists.
Jack Kent Cooke, owner of the expansion Kings, hired Regan as head scout in 1966 before promoting him to GM. Regan, who coached the team in 1970-71 and the first month of the following season, remained with the Kings until 1973.
He had a 25-40-13 record his first season as the coach, and was 2-7-1 before relinquishing the job the next season.
Regan's Kings finished their first NHL season with a 31-33-10 record, one of the best inaugural years for a pro sports expansion team.
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Ernest Trova
ST. LOUIS (AP) _ Ernest Trova, an acclaimed St. Louis artist best known for his "Falling Man" series of works about man at his most imperfect, died Sunday. He was 82.
Trova died at his home in suburban Richmond Heights of congestive heart failure, family spokesman Matt Strauss said Tuesday.
Trova became prominent in the 1960s with his "Falling Man" paintings, prints and sculpture. The armless human figure, a Chicago Tribune critic wrote in 1978, "is simple but not simple-minded. It can be radically transported and transformed while retaining its essential character _ the character of an anonymous 20th century man alone in his environment."
It became a popular symbol of man at his most imperfect, Strauss said.
A one-person exhibition of his paintings inaugurated the Pace Gallery in New York in 1963, where Trova continued to exhibit for more than 20 years.


Updated : 2020-12-04 19:09 GMT+08:00