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Tuesday's Canadian Briefs

Tuesday's Canadian Briefs

Canada will recover in global recession faster than others, Harper says
BRAMPTON, Ontario (AP) _ Canada will emerge from the global recession before any other country and in a stronger economic position than ever, Prime Minister Stephen Harper said Tuesday as his government aggressively moved to sell its fiscal plan.
The rosy picture Harper painted of the ability to not only recover but profit from the worldwide crisis came as he dispatched two of his top lieutenants to deliver variations of the same message: the Conservative stimulus package will put the country on the right track and the opposition must support it.
"Canada was the last advanced country to fall into this recession," Stephen Harper told a business crowd in Brampton, Ontario "We will make sure its effects here are the least severe, and we will come out of this faster than anyone and stronger than ever."
The crisis, ultimately, is an "opportunity to position ourselves so that when the recovery comes, we're among the first to catch the wave."
While Harper positioned Canada at the forefront of economic relief, he also said our fortunes depend on those of the United States.
"We will not turn the corner on this global recession until the American financial sector is fixed," he said.
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Alberta to proclaim bill to create movie czar, film and video inspectors
EDMONTON (AP) _ Coming soon to an Alberta movie house near you: The Return of the Film Police.
The reintroduction of theater inspectors is just one planned change in Alberta's Bill 18 _ the Film and Video Classification Act _ which has passed in the legislature and awaits only proclamation to become law.
The replacement to the outdated Amusements Act also provides for a new movie czar with unchallengeable authority to reclassify films and puts new restrictions on movie-going children. Critics say it will lead to angry box-office confrontations.
Alberta's movie house owners and distributors have complained the bill is vague, draconian and, in the case of inspectors, needlessly resurrects a practice not seen for a generation.
"I'm scratching my head when (the government) stands up and says it's going to be business as usual," said Neil Campbell, a director with the Alberta Motion Picture Industries Association and chief operating officer of Landmark Cinemas in Calgary.
Films shown in Alberta theaters now are rated by a panel of the Alberta Film Commission, while those on video and DVD are ranked by a nationwide average of provinces.
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Quebec man hopes to remember the dead with all-obituary cable channel
MONTREAL (AP) _ A Quebec entrepreneur is planning to bring obituaries out of the back pages of newspapers to a new home on the small screen.
Gerald Dominique hopes "Je me souviens" _ a niche network dedicated to broadcasting digital obituaries _ will be ready to begin broadcasting by the summer.
The French-language speciality channel will charge a fee to broadcast obituaries, prayers, hospitalization notices and messages of thanks.
The Quebec entrepreneur obtained a licence in February from the CRTC and has designs on expanding the channel to the rest of the country, under the moniker "Remember the Name."
"The goal of this channel is to tell stories," Dominique said in an interview with The Canadian Press.
"How many stories are lost all over the world each year _ great stories about people's lives _ those are the stories we hope to tell."
Dominique said he'd often hear about people passing away but that the information would be fragmented or cursory.
Dominique said the TV obits will include sound, music, photos, video, text and testimonials and will cost about the same as a newspaper obit.


Updated : 2021-02-27 09:42 GMT+08:00