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Guyana employees say polygraph test is intrusive

Guyana employees say polygraph test is intrusive

President Bharrat Jagdeo said Tuesday that he will review polygraph tests being administered to government workers after complaints that they contain personal questions about sexual preferences and alcohol consumption.
Jagdeo's comments came after some customs officials refused to take the test, which is being administered by a Florida-based company to detect possible corruption among low-ranking customs officials and in other government departments.
Jagdeo first ordered the tests last year in response to criticism that the anti-drug unit was inefficient and had not made any major drug arrests in 2008.
Then-chief Orville Nedd blamed a shortage of staff and equipment for the department's lack of success. But he and eight officers were later fired after they failed their polygraphs.
The government refuses to identify the company conducting the tests, what questions the tests contain, or why personal questions such as sexual preference might be considered relevant.
Guyana serves as a drug route for Colombian cocaine destined for the U.S. and Europe.
The U.S. State Department has praised the government's decision to administer the tests, saying they are normal procedure for top agents from the FBI and the Drug Enforcement Administration.


Updated : 2021-04-16 00:48 GMT+08:00