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DPP to establish new platform to formulate China policy

DPP to establish new platform to formulate China policy

The opposition Democratic Progressive Party will set up a new task force that "will propose policies to cope with changes in the cross-strait situation."
DPP Chairwoman Tsai Ing-wen announced the decision to set up the "China Affairs Task Force" during a scheduled meeting of the party's Central Standing Committee.
The announcement followed a discussion of an analysis by Central Police University Public Security Department Association Professor Tung Li-wen, who is also deputy director of the Taiwan Foundation for Democracy, on the six-point statement made Dec. 31 by People's Republic of China State Chairman and ruling Chinese Communist Party General Secretary Hu Jintao.
Tsai, who was herself formerly chairwoman of the Cabinet-level Mainland Affairs Council from 2000 to 2004 under the previous DPP government, named former National Security Council deputy secretary-general Chen Chung-hsin to convene the new committee, whose members will include senior party leaders and legislators, former DPP government officials with experience in China affairs and scholars.
DPP Culture and Information Department Director Cheng Wen-tsan related that Tung had stated that Hu's speech was issued at the point of the change of power in the United States and the realization of cross-strait "direct links" as "a programmatic document to promote unification" and excluded any room for the advocation of Chinese Nationalist Party (Kuomintang) President Ma Ying-jeou of "one China with separate interpretations."
Tung said that Hu's speech represented "three restrictions."
The CPU associate professor stated that Hu aimed to "narrow Taiwan's future" to unification with the PRC and "drew a red line for Ma Ying-jeou" by declaring that "the two sides of the Taiwan Strait will restore unity" and by declaring that cross-strait differences do not involve "sovereignty or the recreation of national territory, but the ending of political antagonism."
"In another words, the unification of China excludes the possibility of a federation or a commonwealth," said Tung.
Second, Tung said that Hu defined the "Consensus of 1992" under the "one China framework" and "drew a second red line against Ma Ying-jeou" by excluding any room for the new president's notion of "mutual non-denial" and by insisting that the two sides are "divided" but not "separate."
Moreover, Tung said Hu also restricted any influence or "interference" from the United States in cross-strait affairs and also declared that there was only a question of "international participation" for Taiwan and excluded any question of "Taiwan's international space."
The CPU professor stated that "Taiwan democracy" is the "weak abdomen of Ma Ying-jeou and the KMT-CCP forum" and Tung urged the DPP to issue an official response in which the opposition party would review the three decades of Taiwan's democratic experience and clearly raise the principles of "democracy, sovereignty, peace and prosperity."
In addition, Tung said the DPP should also raise the issue "democracy across the Taiwan Strait" and use the manner in which the PRC regime treats dissidents on the China mainland as "an index to judge whether the CCP can be trusted."
"At a time when the KMT and the CCP are mutually giving each other moral support and taking concerted action together, the DPP must represent the mainstream Taiwan public opinion and raise different views," added Cheng.
"The DPP must clearly manifest Taiwan's democratic experience and the principle of 唼overeignty rests with the people' under which only the 23 million Taiwan people have the right to decide Taiwan's future," said the DPP spokesman.
Besides continuing negotiations on cross-strait issues between the KMT and CCP governments, Cheng related that the coming year will feature numerous events and major issues in cross-strait policy, including the 30th anniversary of the passage of the Taiwan Relations Act in the United States, the 50th anniversary of the revolt against CCP rule in Tibet led by the Dalai Lama and the 20th anniversary of the Beijing regime's bloody suppression of the Chinese democracy movement in the Tiananmen Incident of June 4, 1989.