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Advanced ideas become DPP's priority: Tsai

 Tsai Ing-wen, chairwoman of the Democratic Progressive Party, delivers a speech during a rally to support Taiwan's former president Chen Shui-bian, w...

Taiwan Former President

Tsai Ing-wen, chairwoman of the Democratic Progressive Party, delivers a speech during a rally to support Taiwan's former president Chen Shui-bian, w...

The opposition Democratic Progressive Party's (DPP) priority for 2009 is to rethink its basic policies and offer more advanced ideas, chairwoman Tsai Ing-wen said in an online interview yesterday.
The party had already succeeded in reducing internal rivalry between its factions, Tsai told Yahoo Kimo, noting that peace and harmony reigned within the DPP.
She said she wanted to give the party a more balanced membership. In the past, the DPP has had the image of being close to the grassroots, and strong in Southern Taiwan, but people have forgotten that its origin lies with the urban middle class, Tsai said. "We hope we can create a new balanced image," she said.
Tsai said she feared that Taiwan's interests were being sacrificed by the rapid opening of transportation and economic links with China by the Kuomintang (KMT) administration of President Ma Ying-jeou.
"An opening of any degree will result in a redistribution of wealth, so it could harm our traditional economic sectors, agriculture in the south and low-income white-collar employees," Tsai said, adding that if Chinese people were allowed to work in Taiwan they would reduce job opportunities for locals.
The DPP's biggest reproach against the government was that it had failed to take any measures to protect Taiwanese society against the negative impact of opening up to China, the opposition leader said.
Tsai called on Ma to do his homework, and said she would do the same, and come up with strong ideas later in the year. She didn't rule out meeting Ma to let him know the opposition's concerns, but probably only a couple of months from now, after the party holds conferences to discuss the economy and the state of Taiwan.
The DPP would never give up its determination to defend Taiwan’s sovereignty, Tsai responded to members of the online public who questioned her about Taiwan Independence.
The biggest consensus in Taiwanese society was that the independence and sovereignty belonged to its 23 million people, Tsai said.
When DPP members added a Taiwan Independence clause to the party's basic charter in 1991, they did so to protect the island's sovereignty, Tsai said. China has recently said it would consider opening contacts with the DPP if the party dropped its insistence on the independence issue.
Tsai was elected DPP leader last year after the party lost both legislative and presidential elections. The opposition is now preparing to gain ground in county and city elections later this year. The media have named Tsai as a likely candidate, but she has been reluctant to comment on the reports.


Updated : 2021-04-12 06:58 GMT+08:00