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Ma's aide arrested on suspicion of spying for China

Prosecutors searched the Presidential Office and took specialist Wang Ren-bing for interrogation on Jan. 14. Wang was detained incommunicado early Thu...
Ma's aide arrested on suspicion of spying for China
Taiwan Presidential Office employee detained for alleged spying in January, 2009. The Ministry of Justice denied media reports on Feb. 17 that its Bur...

Prosecutors searched the Presidential Office and took specialist Wang Ren-bing for interrogation on Jan. 14. Wang was detained incommunicado early Thu...

Taiwan Presidential Office employee detained for alleged spying in January, 2009. The Ministry of Justice denied media reports on Feb. 17 that its Bur...

A Presidential Office staffer and a legislative aide were taken to prison yesterday on suspicion of passing confidential documents about last year's presidential transition to China. The Taipei District Court approved their detention early yesterday morning after the first-ever prosecutors' raid on part of the Presidential Office building.
The official arrested, Wang Jen-ping, joined the presidential staff in 2001 and worked for consecutive vice secretary-generals. In March and April last year, he reportedly passed on documents about the preparation for the May inauguration of President Ma Ying-jeou to Chen Pin-jen, an aide to ruling Kuomintang lawmaker Liao Kuo-tung. Chen faxed the information to Chinese intelligence agents, reports said.
Wang and Chen were ordered detained on suspicions of violations against the National Security Act and the National Secrets Protection Act, and because there were fears they might collude with other suspects or flee the country.
The two men's stories did not match completely, and Chen was found to have received unexplained sums of money in his accounts, the Chinese-language United Evening News reported.
The presidential official might have passed on more than 100 documents to China over a period longer than two years, the paper also said.
Chen was apparently convicted of perjury once in the trial of a lawmaker for vote buying, but was then recommended to Liao, the KMT legislator said. Liao told reporters yesterday he was not familiar with Chen since his aide worked on a volunteer basis and rarely appeared at his office.
Lawmakers expressed shock and dismay that anyone working at the Presidential Office could be passing on secrets to China. They also called for stricter supervision of staff working at sensitive government departments.
"All staffers at the Presidential Office and the National Security Council should be subject to loyalty tests," KMT lawmaker Chang Hsien-yao told reporters.
The opposition Democratic Progressive Party said the case showed that China had not given up on its plans to swallow Taiwan, and that there was no trust possible between the two sides.
President Ma Ying-jeou should give up his pro-China policies now that it's clear that Beijing is continuing to spy despite his claims that both sides have achieved a level of trust, DPP spokesman Cheng Wen-tsang told reporters.


Updated : 2021-06-22 04:37 GMT+08:00