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Master Hsing Yun offers to help families of deceased monks

Master Hsing Yun offers to help families of deceased monks

Taipei, Jan. 15 (CNA) Master Hsing Yun, one of the most venerable Buddhist leaders in Taiwan, on Thursday offered to help the families of two mainland Chinese monks who died recently while on a visit to Taiwan, in a case of suspected homicide-suicide.
Hsing Yun, founder of the Fo Guang Shan Monastery based in Kaohsiung County, southern Taiwan, said his monastery would like to foot the bill for the families of the two deceased monks to travel to Taiwan for the funerals and other related affairs.
Hsing Yun made the offer during a courtesy call on Mayor Lin Junq-tzer of Hsinchu City, northern Taiwan, where the two monks and the rest of the group from Linggu Temple in China's Nanjing City had been staying at a hotel.
Lin told Hsing Yun that the Hsinchu city government and the Hsuan Chuang Culture and Education Foundation, an affiliate of the private Hsuan Chuang University in Hsinchu City, will do their best to take care of matters related to the death of the two monks.
The two monks, identified as Dharma Master Jingran, abbot of the Linggu Temple in China's Nanjing City, and Dharma Master Chunru, supervisor of the same temple, were part of a six-member group invited by the Hsuan Chuang Culture and Education Foundation to visit Taiwan on a goodwill tour.
Jingran, who was found dead in his hotel room Wednesday, is believed to have been killed by Chunru, who later jumped to his death from the roof of the same hotel, Hsinchu police said.
According to police, it appeared that Chunru hit Jingran on the head with a lampstand during a heated argument between them the day before the bodies were found.
Shocked by Jingran's death, Chunru then jumped to his death, police said. Police later discovered a note in his pocket that read, "Please urge the police to catch me; only then can I find peace of mind." Hsinchu police said they are further investigating the cause of deaths and the motive behind the apparent murder.
During talks with Mayor Lin, Hsing Yun said he met Jingran and Chunru when he last visited Linggu Temple in Nanjing City on Nov. 15, 2008. He said he remembered that Jingran was carefree and lighthearted and that Chunru seemed to have some problems on his mind.
According to Hsing Yun, before the two monks departed for Taiwan, some people said it was inadvisable for them to travel in the same group, but Jingran said he could handle it.
The Linggu Temple, built some 1,400 years ago, is one of the three major Buddhist temples in China, according to Hsing Yun.
The four other members of the visiting Linggu Temple group have suspended their itinerary since the incident came to light Wednesday morning.
(By Deborah Kuo)




Updated : 2021-03-06 23:18 GMT+08:00