Alexa

Wednesday's Canadian Briefs

Wednesday's Canadian Briefs

Air Canada, Canadian Auto Workers reach tentative agreement on new contract
MONTREAL (AP) _ Air Canada (TSX:AC.B) will head into potentially tough contract negotiations with pilots and flight attendants armed with a three-year contract with the Canadian Auto Workers union for customer service and sales agents.
About 5,000 CAW members are expected to endorse a tentative agreement when nearly two weeks of voting begins with workers in Montreal on Monday.
Local president Leslie Dias said she's confident the deal will be ratified.
"We're not in great times so it's not going to be a slam dunk, but I think when people take a look at the overall package that they will be satisfied with it," she said in an interview Wednesday.
Details of the agreement were not being released, but include changes affecting employees working in Aeroplan contact centres and the preservation of work at airports.
Loyalty rewards company Groupe Aeroplan (TSX:AER), which was spun off during the airline's restructuring, said it includes a plan that allows employees to transition to Aeroplan or remain at Air Canada.
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People who attend religious services less likely to attempt suicide: study
WINNIPEG (AP) _ Don't go to a church, synagogue, temple or mosque regularly?
Psychiatric researchers at the University of Manitoba say people who don't are twice as likely to try to take their own life compared to faithful worshippers.
Daniel Rasic, the study's principal author, examined the link between regular religious attendance and attempted suicide by using a national community health survey of 37,000 respondents from Statistics Canada. The study, published in the Journal of Affective Disorders, is believed to be the first to use national data to look at that relationship.
People who attended religious services were less likely to have attempted suicide or had suicidal thoughts in the past year than those who did not, Rasic said. The same was true for people with a history of depression or anxiety disorders.
"Those people who attended church at least once a year had decreased rates of suicidal attempts," said Rasic, now a resident at Dalhousie University in Halifax. "Those who don't are twice as likely to have attempted suicide."
Respondents who identified themselves simply as "spiritual" and didn't adhere to an organized religion had the same rate of attempted suicide as non-believers, he added.