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Taiwan's police admit hitting Chou at protest

Taiwan's police admit hitting Chou at protest

Police admitted beating an opposition member of the Taipei City Council during an anti-Chinese protest, while students invited President Ma Ying-jeou yesterday to attend a mock human rights funeral.
Chou Wei-yu of the Democratic Progressive Party was one of 66 people listed for violent behavior against the police during the Nov. 3 to 7 visit by top Chinese envoy Chen Yunlin. During his stay, Chen signed four agreements with Taiwan and met President Ma Ying-jeou, but the visit was most noted for the violence during almost daily protests against his presence.
During a session of the City Council Thursday, police officers admitted that it was actually a policeman who beat Chou, and not the other way round. The video recordings on which the original assessment against Chou was made, were misleading, police said. The original police statement said Chou had been accidentally hit by a plastic water bottle thrown by other protesters.
If an investigation confirmed the facts, the police officer involved in the incident with Chou could face disciplinary measures.
A recording released by the DPP showed a bareheaded uniformed police officer hitting Chou with his fists. He hit the politician in the left eye, breaking his glasses and injuring his eye.
Taipei Mayor Hau Lung-pin refused to apologize yesterday, saying it was wrong for a public employee to use violence during the exercise of his function, but adding that the precise circumstances of the incident still had to be determined.
DPP councilors wondered how many of the other 66 individuals listed as suspects in the violent incidents had also been misjudged.
DPP lawmaker Lin Shu-fen yesterday failed to appear for questioning over an incident during a protesters' siege of the Grand Formosa Regent Hotel on Nov. 5. Chen was forced to stay inside until 2 a.m. the following day after a dinner hosted by KMT chairman Wu Poh-hsiung.
Meanwhile, students who have been holding a sit-in protest against police brutality since Nov. 6 sent out invitations to President Ma Ying-jeou and other government members yesterday for a "human rights funeral" scheduled for tomorrow morning.
The students, who are sitting under the gate to Taipei's Liberty Square, are planning ads announcing the death of human rights in Taiwan.
The protesters, known as the "Wild Strawberry Movement," want a revision to the Parade and Assembly Law to abolish the requirement that protesters have to file an application with police before the protest can go ahead. They want a simple registration to suffice. The change was included in Ma's election platform. The KMT is reportedly preparing a public hearing which would include student representatives.


Updated : 2021-07-31 11:08 GMT+08:00