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Taiwanese businesses welcome China envoy visit

Taiwanese businesses welcome China envoy visit

Taiwanese business leaders expressed support Tuesday for an upcoming visit by a top China envoy, saying it could lead Chinese banks to inject needed funds into the island and bolster its flagging economy.
In comments ahead of next week's historic visit by Chen Yunlin, chairman of the mainland's Association for Relations Across the Taiwan Strait, business leaders told a news conference they were urging Taiwanese companies to pool resources with China to tackle the global financial crisis.
Chen will be the most senior Chinese envoy to arrive in Taiwan for bilateral talks since the two sides split in 1949 during China's civil war.
"I hope Chen's visit will pave the way for Chinese banks to inject money into Taiwanese businesses" that have been denied loans from local banks with credit problems, said Preston Chen, head of Taiwan's National Federation of Industries.
Chen is to arrive in Taipei on Nov. 3 as head of a 60-member delegation that includes several leading mainland bankers.
Chang Pen-tsao, chairman of Taiwan's General Chamber of Commerce, said Taiwanese should welcome Chen because they could immediately benefit if the two sides reach agreements on the introduction of direct cargo flights and the expansion of weekend passenger flights to daily service.
Chen is scheduled to discuss those issues with his Taiwanese counterpart, Chiang Pin-kung, head of the Straits Exchange Foundation.
Chen's trip comes under the shadow of a scuffle last week between his deputy, Zhang Mingqing, and pro-independence supporters during Zhang's informal visit from China. A small number of protesters in the southern Taiwanese city of Tainan pushed Zhang and toppled him to the ground. The incident caused Zhang to leave Taiwan two days ahead of his scheduled departure.
The opposition Democratic Progressive Party has said it may stage more protests when Chen arrives, saying it fears China could use the negotiations to assert control of the self-governed island.
Despite the 1949 split, Beijing continues to claim the island as part of its territory.


Updated : 2021-03-08 11:40 GMT+08:00