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Taiwan Presidential Office promises reforms in response to DPP protest

Taiwan Presidential Office promises reforms in response to DPP protest

The government will review its operations and make necessary reform to resolve public grievances, Presidential Office spokesman Wang Yu-chi said Saturday.
Wang made the remarks after tens of thousands of opposition supporters marched through downtown Taipei earlier that day to protest the Kuomintang administration's growing ties with China, where a tainted milk powder scandal has fueled fresh distrust toward Beijing among local citizens.
In the strongest display of opposition to President Ma Ying-jeou since his inauguration May 20, demonstrators also demanded that Ma reshuffle the Cabinet immediately and apologize for his failure to deliver on his campaign promise to improve the economy.
The street protest was organized by the main opposition Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) and its ally -- the Taiwan Solidarity Union -- and major pro-independence groups.
Acknowledging that the demonstrators' appeals are the government's policy goals, Wang said that probably, insufficient government efforts, coupled with the ongoing global financial turmoil, have added to people's hardships and thus fueled public discontent.
"The government will make a thorough review and do whatever it can to meet the public's demand and expectations," Wang said, adding that the administration is more than willing to make all necessary reforms.
Responding to DPP Chairwoman Tsai Ing-wen's call for a debate with Ma on sovereignty issue, Wang said Ma hopes to meet Tsai to discuss issues regarding prevention of violence and corruption and major economic topics.
Despite its previous failed attempts to invite Tsai for face-to-face talks with Ma, Wang said the Presidential Office will continue its efforts to arrange for a Ma-Tsai meeting.
As protesting China's shipments of melamine-tainted milk products and other food ingredients was also a major appeal of the protest march, Wang said food safety is a priority item on the agenda for an upcoming meeting between the top leaders of the quasi-official intermediary bodies on both sides of the Taiwan Strait.
Wang was referring to a meeting in Taipei early next month between Straits Exchange Foundation (SEF) Chairman Chiang Pin-kung and his Chinese counterpart, Chen Yunlin, president of the Association for Relations Across the Taiwan Straits (ARATS).
Wang said the SEF and ARATS have forged a direct communication mechanism for food safety concerns.


Updated : 2021-02-26 13:05 GMT+08:00