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Reade fails, but British coach still pushing BMX

Reade fails, but British coach still pushing BMX

There was no golden ending to Shanaze Reade's Olympic story. Instead of standing on the victory rostrum, she left in a team car for x-rays on a possible broken hand.
"I guess you, like they say, have to learn the hard way, and I learned the hard way today," said the British BMX racer.
Reade, a two-time world champion, went into the women's final as favorite but crashed on the last bend as she tried to overtake eventual winner Anne-Caroline Chausson of France.
"I gave it the best shot I had," Reade conceded. And at 19, she will undoubtedly be back for another try when the Olympics takes place in Britain in four years' time.
"She is very, very young," said Dave Brailsford, British Cycling's performance coach. "It hasn't gone her way this time, but she will be better off for the experience, and certainly in London I think she's going to be a formidable opponent for anybody to beat."
It was a disappointing end for a British cycling team that has been dominant at these games.
From Nicole Cooke's gold in the road race on the first day of competition to the seven golds the track riders took in the velodrome, Britain showed it was leading the way in cycling.
And BMX, Brailsford said, is a very important part of that, even if it is only now making an appearance in the Olympic Games.
"The sport of BMX is a fantastic entry point into the sport of cycling," he said. "If you ask the youngsters what they would like to do, they will probably say BMX with all the jumps and bumps."
Triple track gold-medalist Chris Hoy began his cycling career in BMX, and team sprint gold medalist Jamie Staff was a BMX world champion before switching to the track.
Reade herself is a two-time track cycling world champion, taking the women's sprint event with Victoria Pendleton in both 2007 and 2008. The women's team sprint is not an Olympic event.
"I'm trying to push the whole sport of BMX forward and trying to get many more facilities into the country," said Brailsford.
"It's a great family environment for the youngsters to start off, and you can start very young, you can start at 6.
Inclusion of BMX in the Olympics has also provided a boost for the riders, Brailsford said. They all feel, he said, that "they are definitely athletes now."


Updated : 2021-02-28 18:45 GMT+08:00