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Tycoon suggests settling sovereignty issue through referendums

Robert Tsao, honorary chairman of United Microelectronics Corp.(UMC), is seen speaking at a political rally in this December 29, 2007 file photo.

Robert Tsao, honorary chairman of United Microelectronics Corp.(UMC), is seen speaking at a political rally in this December 29, 2007 file photo.

A prominent high technology business leader criticized President Ma Ying-jeou's cross-Taiwan Strait policy Tuesday, claiming that Ma's "three noes" pledge serves no purpose except to waste time.
Robert Tsao, honorary chairman of United Microelectronics Corp., (UMC) made the statement while advocating the establishment of a cross-strait peace law, during a speech at National Cheng Kung University in Tainan City, southern Taiwan.
According to Tsao, Ma's stance of "no unification, no independence and no use of force" regarding cross-strait relations only represents the lack of a clear-cut strategy.
"The independence-unification dispute between Taiwan and China can be resolved by due process, which means holding referendums so that the Taiwan people can decide," he said.
Taiwan's people, whether they are pro-independence or pro-unification, should drop their prejudices when it comes to the independence-unification issue and settle their differences through the process of referendums, Tsao said.
There is no major division in Taiwan with respect to that issue, although people in the north of the country are more flexible toward Taiwan's unification with China, while people in the south are more receptive to Taiwan's pursuit of de-jure independence, he stated.
In essence, the independence-unification problem resides with China because it is China that is seeking to unify with Taiwan, therefore, Beijing should take the initiative to establish due process, he contended.
Beijing should clearly put forward its conditions -- whether it is the "two countries, one system" unification formula or "high degree of autonomy" proposal -- and allow the Taiwan people to decide the country's future by means of referendum, Tsao proposed.
"Such a referendum could be held every six, eight or 10 years, which would force Beijing to offer different conditions to the Taiwan people," he suggested.
"By leaving the ball in Beijing's court, Taiwan does not need to waste time on the issue," Tsao said. "It is meaningless for Taiwan's political figures to engage in infighting over it."
While the United States has its Taiwan Relations Act and China its Anti-Secession Law to deal with cross-strait political contingencies, Taiwan has no relevant laws to cope with such situations, he said.


Updated : 2021-04-15 16:58 GMT+08:00