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Late Serbian strongman Slobodan Milosevic's son, Marko, cleared of harassment charges

Late Serbian strongman Slobodan Milosevic's son, Marko, cleared of harassment charges

The son of late Serbian strongman Slobodan Milosevic was acquitted Tuesday of charges that he had harassed and beaten his father's political opponents, Serbian media reported.
The court in the Milosevic family's hometown of Pozarevac cited insufficient evidence and what it said was a lack of intent when it decided to clear Marko Milosevic of all charges, B92 radio reported.
Former pro-democracy activists have accused Marko Milosevic and his aides of pressuring, harassing and beating them because of their opposition to his father's rule. They criticized the court ruling on Tuesday and pledged to appeal.
Marko Milosevic fled to Russia after his father was ousted from power in 2000 by a pro-Western coalition. He was tried in absentia and was not present at the court on Tuesday.
Marko Milosevic and his mother, Mirjana Markovic, have refugee status in Russia. Both are wanted in Serbia for alleged cigarette smuggling during Milosevic's rule.
Tuesday's ruling is likely to anger liberal Serbs who feel that Milosevic's family members should be held responsible for alleged wrongdoing during Slobodan Milosevic's rule.
But Marko Milosevic's acquittal also comes as his father's Socialist Party appears poised to join pro-Western parties in forming a new Serbian government after May 11 parliamentary and local elections.
The parliamentary vote resulted in no clear winner, and the Socialists, who came in third, emerged as the kingmakers. Serbian media have reported that the Socialists have made their backing for a coalition with pro-Western parties conditional on an end to the prosecution of Milosevic's family members.
The Beta news agency quoted Momcilo Veljkovic, one of Marko Milosevic's alleged victims from the Otpor student group, as saying that Tuesday's acquittal was politically motivated. Another Otpor member, Radojko Lukovic, described the ruling as "shameful," Beta said.
Milosevic was ousted in 2000 and handed over a year later to the U.N. war crimes tribunal for the former Yugoslavia, where he died of a heart attack in 2006 before the end of his trial on genocide charges.


Updated : 2021-05-07 01:23 GMT+08:00