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Liu Xiang in lineup, then out, after being disqualified for false start

Liu Xiang in lineup, then out, after being disqualified for false start

Liu Xiang felt good enough to race Sunday, lining up for the 110-meter hurdles at the Prefontaine Classic.
The starting line was as far as he got.
China's track superstar was disqualified with a false start, making him 0-for-2 in America _ as in, he entered two races but didn't run in either.
"Not disappointed, just a pity," Liu said. "But it is past already."
Meanwhile, American pole vaulter Brad Walker did compete and cleared 6.04 meters (19 feet, 9 3/4 inches), breaking an eight-year-old American record of 6.03 (19-9 1/2) previously held by Jeff Hartwig.
Walker shared the spotlight at America's biggest track meet with Maria Mutola, the middle-distance star from Mozambique, who won the 800 meters for the 16th straight year in this, her final appearance at Prefontaine.
Mutola kissed the track after the race.
"All the emotion, the stress is behind me now that I was able to finish good," she said.
Other winners included former world champion Torri Edwards, who ran the 100 in 10.94.
After missing the Athens Olympics because of a doping ban she received even though authorities ruled she wasn't intentionally trying to cheat, Edwards appears to be rounding into form for a bid to Beijing while others are struggling.
Sanya Richards won the women's 400 in 50.10 seconds.
Ethiopia's Kenenisa Bekele failed to improve his world record in the 10,000, but still finished in 26:25.97, the fourth-fastest ever.
Another Ethiopian Meseret Defar fell short of her bid to regain the world record taken from her countrywoman, Tirunesh Dibaba, two days ago in Oslo. Defar won in 14:38.73, nearly 38 seconds off the new world mark of 14:11.15 set by Dibaba.
Kenyan-born Bernard Lagat, a naturalized American citizen since 2004, won the rarely run two miles _ run instead of the 1,500 meters here _ in a time of 8:12.45.
Liu, the defending Olympic gold medalist and current world record holder was scratched from last week's race in New York with a sore right hamstring and said he would decide at race time Sunday whether he would compete. And indeed, he was out there on a crystal clear day in Eugene, pacing around, looking ready to go.
When the eight hurdlers first lined up, it was Liu's countryman, Shi Dongpeng, who got hit with a false start. But the first miscue is charged to the entire field, making the second false start the one that really counts.
It was there that Liu flinched ever so slightly before the gun. Knowing he was gone, he shook his head in frustration, having come all the way to the United States and never getting to compete.
Asked what happened, he said "nothing happened."
"I didn't even realize I had the false start," Liu said.
That left the door open for Anwar Moore of the United States, who won the suddenly watered-down race in 13.09 seconds.
"I don't know. I can't call it," Moore said when asked if Liu flinched. "The judges called a false start, so I don't know."
Liu will head back to China, where his condition certainly will be one of the hottest topics between now and the Beijing Olympics.
"It's getting better," Liu said of the hamstring. "Much better than New York."
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AP Sports Writer Bob Baum contributed to this report.