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Secretary-General Hsueh dismisses green card accusation, shows passport history to media

Secretary-General Hsueh dismisses green card accusation, shows passport history to media

Executive Yuan Secretary-General, Hsueh Hsiang-chuan, yesterday held a press conference to show his passport history, saying he began to use non-immigrant visas to enter the United States in 1991 and that his green card had already expired.
Hsueh admitted he had applied for a green card more than thirty years ago.
He said he had tried to find his used passports, and could only trace a record as far back as the one in 1991 when he had already begun to use non-immigrant visas to enter the U.S.
Hsieh quoted an interview by the former American Institute in Taipei Director, Douglas Paal, with the local media on March 21 this year in which Paal said one's green card expires if it's not used for more than one year.
The press conference was jointly attended by Executive Yuan Spokeswoman Vanessa Shih and Central Personnel Administration Minister Chen Ching-chiou (陳清秀).
Shih said no Cabinet members held foreign nationality when they swore in their Cabinet posts, but more time is needed to look into their foreign residence history.
During the press conference, Shih disclosed that Chen Tain-jy, the chairman of the Council for Economic Planning and Development, had also once held permanent residency for the U.S.
Shih said that Environmental Protection Administration Minister, Stephen Shen (沈世宏), and Sports Affairs Council Chairwoman, Tai Hsia-ling (戴遐玲), had reported to the Cabinet their Canadian residence history. Shih said Shen's Canadian residency was already annulled while Tai's annulment was still being processed.
The Center for Personnel Administration Minister, Chen, said the law now forbid any public servant to hold dual nationalities, but did not forbid the public servant to hold a foreign residency. Chen said the reason that there is no law forbidding residency abroad is that it does not affect one's loyalty to one's country.
Chen went on to explain the current related regulations regarding foreign residency.
He said that although the background checking form did request the public servant to report their status of foreign residency, the main reason for checking was to see whether one had any unknown interests abroad.
Chen said background checking on foreign residency could only be used by a department head as a reference for an employee's background, and foreign residency posed no legal problem at all.
Chen also showed the local media a document, issued by the Executive Yuan on January 24 1979, in which the government decided to halt its attempts to regulate a public servant's possession of foreign residency.


Updated : 2021-07-30 00:22 GMT+08:00