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Celtics keep Lakers guessing about extent of Pierce injury

Boston Celtics Paul Pierce shoots during a team practice session in Boston, Massachusetts on Saturday.

Boston Celtics Paul Pierce shoots during a team practice session in Boston, Massachusetts on Saturday.

Paul Pierce and the Boston Celtics kept the Los Angeles Lakers guessing over the extent of the injury to their captain on Saturday ahead of Game Two of the NBA finals.
Pierce's injury to his right knee and dramatic comeback to lead Boston to a 98-88 victory in Game One on Thursday has been the talking point of the best-of-seven series and dominated the spotlight again as teams went through final practice before yesterday's pivotal clash.
Carried off the court by his team mates and pushed into the locker room on a wheelchair only to return a few minutes later to spark a third quarter rally, Pierce's stunning comeback has been hailed as one for the ages by Boston supporters.
But the Lakers and their fans have been left less awestruck, questioning the severity of Pierce's injury and adding fuel to NBA's most heated rivalry.
Almost lost in the Pierce debate has been another injury to the Celtics' starting center Kendrick Perkins, who sustained a high-ankle sprain in the third quarter of Thursday's game that has left his status equally uncertain.
"I don't know yet," Boston coach Doc Rivers told reporters when asked about his players's fitness. "I anticipate them both playing, but I just don't know yet.
"I'm concerned, but you know, I think they'll both play. I don't know how effective either one will be.
"If we played today, could either one of them play It would be dicey, but I think they could."
Pierce said he "definitely" expected to be on the court yesterday saying the injury had responded well to intense treatment.
But the Celtics leading scorer also admitted he still felt stiffness and did not yet have complete range of motion.
"I think it's going to be easy as far as handling it mentally because once you step foot on that court, hear the crowd, you look up and you see posters of the finals, I'm totally going to probably forget about it," said Pierce. "From there on my adrenaline will probably get going.
"Usually you tend to forget about injuries when you're on that court and you're playing for something special.
"That's what you dream about all your life."


Updated : 2021-05-08 15:34 GMT+08:00