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Tirunesh Dibaba breaks women's world 5,000-meter record at Bislett Games

Tirunesh Dibaba breaks women's world 5,000-meter record at Bislett Games

Tirunesh Dibaba of Ethiopia broke the women's world 5,000-meter record by more than five seconds with a time of 14 minutes, 11.15 seconds at the Bislett Games on Friday.
Dibaba, an Olympic and world champion setting her first outdoor world mark, improved the previous record of 14:16:63 by countrywoman Meseret Defar set last year at Bislett Stadium. Defar did not enter Friday's race.
"I was not expecting such a record, but it is very important for me," Dibaba said. "It was my dream to break a high quality world record. God helped me today to achieve something special."
Dibaba got excellent pacemaking from Anna Alminova of Russia and was inside world record pace for the last 2,000 meters. At the 4,000 mark, with Alminova out of the race, Dibaba was just over a second inside the pace she needed. She obliterated the record with a furious finish.
Lucy Wangui of Kenya finished second in 14:33.49 and Ejegayehu Dibaba, one of Dibaba's two sisters in the field, placed third in 14:36.78.
"My sister was telling me that I could do it," Dibaba said. "I'm in my best shape ever. I could see that I was off the pace after the first three kilometers and therefore I pushed forward."
It was the 54th world record at Bislett Stadium since 1924, and the first since it was rebuilt four years ago.
In the men's featured race, Olympic and world champion Jeremy Wariner won the 400 in a world season best of 43.98 seconds. Chris Brown of the Bahamas was second in 44.40.
Wariner, whose nine-race win streak was snapped by fellow American LaShawn Merritt in Berlin last week, took the lead in the last curve and was never challenged down the final straightaway.
"It feels great to be back on top," Wariner said. "I concentrated more for the last 100 and it worked better than in Berlin. I felt Chris Brown on my side, but I was able to speed up. I had a kick which I missed in Berlin.
"I proved who is the best in the world. I never went to the (U.S. Olympic trials) with a sub-44, so that is also good."
Meanwhile, after losing the women's 100 by just 0.01 last year, Sherri Ann Brooks won it on Friday by the same narrow margin.
Running on a hot night in ideal conditions, the Jamaican clocked 11.24 seconds, and Bianca Knight of the United States was second in 11.25. Yuliya Nesterenko of Belarus was third in 11.26.
Last year, Brooks finished second in 11.23 to Stephanie Durst of the United States, who had to settle with sixth (11.48) this time.
Derrick Atkins of the Bahamas won the men's 100 in 9.98, 0.06 ahead of Mike Rodgers of the United States.
World record-holder Gulnara Samitova-Galkina won the women's 3,000 steeplechase in 9:14.77, more than 13 seconds outside the record the Russian has held since 2004.
Samitova-Galkina got excellent pacemaking during the first few laps and was inside the world record after one kilometer. But after taking off alone and building a big lead, she couldn't keep up the pace.
The women's steeplechase became an official event for world records in January 2000, and has been contested only at the last two world championships in 2005 and '07. The women's steeplechase will be held for the first time at the Olympics in Beijing.