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Cycling's governing body prepares new 'no-start' anti-doping rule

Cycling's governing body prepares new 'no-start' anti-doping rule

Cycling's world governing body is preparing to introduce a "no-start" rule against riders suspected of doping.
The International Cycling Union proposal would prevent riders starting a race for 15 days after they return a suspicious result in tests as part of the sport's biological passport program. It will be voted on next week.
"It is already clear that the biological passport is acting as a deterrent," the UCI said in a statement Friday. "Some teams have decided to take measures against riders showing abnormal blood results."
German team Milram fired Igor Astarloa last week because of a suspicious blood test. The Spanish rider is contesting the decision.
The biological passport project is costing US$8 million (euro5 million) and could be adopted by other sports.
Athletes give a series of blood and urine samples to create an individual biological profile. Doping offenses are then detected as fluctuations from their norm rather than tests to find specific substances.
Suspicious readings are referred to members of a nine-man panel of independent experts who recommend disciplinary action to the governing body.
More than 850 professional riders in the program have been tested at least twice, giving a total of 3,185 samples in the first five months of the year, the UCI said.
Its management committee will vote on introducing the no-start rule at a meeting in Copenhagen, Denmark, on June 12-13.