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Canada's PM denies his party tried to bribe dying lawmaker in 2005 vote

Canada's PM denies his party tried to bribe dying lawmaker in 2005 vote

Canada's prime minister has denied allegations his Conservative party attempted to bribe a dying lawmaker before a vote that could have toppled the former Liberal government in 2005.
The widow of the now dead lawmaker reiterated the allegations on Thursday, saying the party offered a $1 million life-insurance policy to Chuck Cadman in exchange for his support.
Weeks before Cadman died of cancer, the independent lawmaker stood up in Parliament to cast the deciding vote that spared former Prime Minister Paul Martin's Liberals from heading into an election.
Cadman's widow, Dona Cadman, said her dying husband told her the Conservatives tried to bribe him. She said her husband came home in a fury to tell her what he said had been offered to him in exchange for his co-operation.
"Two gentlemen had visited him, offered him a $1 million dollar life-insurance policy and a few other things," Cadman told CTV in an interview.
"One (other thing) was being welcomed back into the Conservative party."
Dona Cadman, who is running for the Conservatives, she says she has no regrets about going public _ even if it puts her in an uncomfortable position.
Conservative Prime Minister Stephen Harper said there's no truth to the bribery allegation and notes Chuck Cadman himself publicly said he never received such an offer.
"This story was raised with me two-and-a-half years ago. I looked into it. There is absolutely no truth in it," Harper told legislators.
"Chuck Cadman himself _ on national television, the day of that historic vote _ also indicated this story is not true. I wish everybody would accept his word."
The opposition Liberals have asked police investigate.
The accusation comes as the Conservatives face a series of confidence votes over the next several weeks that could bring down their government.


Updated : 2021-03-08 15:28 GMT+08:00