Alexa
  • Directory of Taiwan

197 nominations received for the 2008 Nobel Peace Prize

197 nominations received for the 2008 Nobel Peace Prize

Former German Chancellor Helmut Kohl, Algeria's president and the artificial world language of Esperanto are believed to be among the nearly 200 nominations for this year's Nobel Peace Prize.
The secretive prize committee released the final count Wednesday, saying 197 nominations _ 164 individuals and 33 organizations _ were postmarked by the Feb. 1 nomination deadline for the prestigious award.
"This is the second-highest number we've had," committee secretary Geir Lundestad told The Associated Press by phone. "The highest number was 199, in 2005."
The Nobel committee does not reveal who is on the list, but those making nominations sometimes announce them.
This year's nominations are believed to include Kohl, Algerian President Abdelaziz Bouteflika, the Esperanto movement and Vietnamese monk Thich Quang Do.
Other candidates who have been announced by their nominators include New Mexico Gov. Bill Richardson for humanitarian efforts in North Korea and Sudan, and a Colorado couple which founded the youth-based Peace Jam movement.
"We are very pleased that we are receiving nominations from all over the world," Lundestad said. "The peace prize has become more and more global."
While the deadline for nominations is Feb. 1, the number traditionally creeps up during the month as late mail arrives or the committee makes its own nominations.
Lundestad said the prize committee had already decided on a short-list of contenders. He wouldn't reveal how many candidates were on it, but said the short-list typically has 30-35 names and is whittled down to about 10 at the committee's next meeting in April.
Last year's peace prize was shared by former U.S. Vice President Al Gore and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change for their work to raise awareness of global warming.
"I think they will try to find someone who is more directly linked to peace this year," said Stein Toennesson, a prominent Nobel-watcher and the director of the International Peace Research Institute-Oslo.
He added there were no obvious candidates, because peacemaking is presently not having a good moment, with conflicts still raging in Iraq, Afghanistan and Sudan, and an outbreak of political violence in Kenya.
The committee may choose Do, a dissident monk who lives under virtual house arrest in Vietnam, or use the spotlight of the Beijing Olympics to honor a Chinese rights activist, Toennesson said.
"I think they will probably seriously look for a Chinese candidate," he told AP, although he added "there is no one with a very high profile."
The Nobel Prizes, first awarded in 1901, are presented on Dec. 10, the anniversary of the death of their creator, Swedish industrialist Alfred Nobel, who died in 1896.
The peace prize is awarded in Oslo, while the medicine, physics, chemistry, literature and economics awards are given out in Stockholm, Sweden.


Updated : 2021-06-24 18:26 GMT+08:00