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Memorial concerts to commemorate the 228 Incident

Maestro Vasary set to lead NSO in series of outdoor performances

Memorial concerts to commemorate the 228 Incident

To commemorate the 61st anniversary of the 228 Incident, the Council for Cultural Affairs will sponsor a memorial concert at Taipei's Taiwan Democracy Memorial Hall this evening.
This year, maestro Tamas Vasary will lead the National Symphony Orchestra to perform in the hall's outdoor plaza. Vasary has been the principal conductor of the Hungarian Radio Symphony Orchestra since 1993. He was born in Hungary, where he studied with Dohnanyi. After obtaining his diploma at the Franz Liszt Academy, Vasary worked as an assistant of Zoltan Kodaly.
In 1956, he left Hungary and in 1961 he made his piano debut in London and New York, starting a very important global career. Now he is better known as conductor rather than as a pianist.
Under the direction of Bertrand de Billy, the NSO will join forces with the Chorus of the Vienna State Opera, the National Experimental Chorus, the Taipei Symphony Orchestra, and the Century Symphony Orchestra, which is also from Taipei. This year the NSO has the privilege of collaborating with the prestigious Chorus of the Vienna State Opera for the first time with Zdenek Macal conducting.
Macal was forced to leave his homeland of Czechoslovakia when the Soviet army invaded the country to suppress the uprising in 1968. After 35 years in exile, Macal returned to his homeland to take up the baton in the Prague Spring Festival and received enthusiastic applause for the music enriched by his life experience.
One of the featured concerts will open with the 1947 Overture composed by Hsiao Tyzen, a composer considered by many as Taiwan's Rachmaninoff.
Born in Kaohsiung City in 1938, Hsiao is a Taiwanese composer of the neo-Romantic school. Many of his vocal works set poems written in Taiwanese, the mother tongue of the majority of the island's residents. His compositions stand as musical manifestations of the Taiwanese literature movement.
Johannes Brahms' German Requiem, which is also on the bill, is a choral masterpiece that is comprised of adopted verses from the German Bible.
This year's concert will also feature Beethoven's Ode to Joy sung in Taiwanese.
Acting Orchstra Director Liu Suan-yung said, "Taiwanese is actually a very beautiful language, but we rarely have the chance to sing world-famous songs in Taiwanese. "This time we asked well-known Taiwanese poet Hsiang Yang (向陽) to write the Taiwanese lyrics. We hope that the lyrics will be printed in the programs so that the audience can sing with us," Liu said.


Updated : 2021-04-15 03:58 GMT+08:00