Alexa
  • Directory of Taiwan

Europeans sweep acting categories, Coens' `No Country for Old Men' wins four Oscars

Europeans sweep acting categories, Coens' `No Country for Old Men' wins four Oscars

Europeans swept the acting categories at the Oscars while the Coen brothers completed their journey from the fringes to Hollywood's mainstream as their crime saga "No Country for Old Men" won four Academy Awards, including best picture.
British actor Daniel Day-Lewis and France's Marion Cotillard took best lead actor and actress on Sunday night. The supporting actor and actress prizes went to Spain's Javier Bardem and British actress Tilda Swinton.
The only other time in the Oscars' 80-year history that all four acting winners were foreign born was 1964, when the recipients were Britons Rex Harrison, Julie Andrews and Peter Ustinov and Russian Lila Kedrova.
Bardem won for supporting actor in "No Country," which earned Joel and Ethan Coen best director, best adapted screenplay and the best-picture honor as producers.
Accepting the directing honor alongside his brother, Joel Coen recalled how they were making films since childhood, including one at the Minneapolis airport called "Henry Kissinger: Man on the Go."
"What we do now doesn't feel that much different from what we were doing then," Joel Coen said. "We're very thankful to all of you out there for continuing to let us play in our corner of the sandbox."
Day-Lewis won his second best-actor Academy Award for the oil-boom epic "There Will Be Blood," while "La Vie En Rose" star Cotillard was a surprise winner for best actress, riding the spirit of Edith Piaf to Oscar triumph over British screen legend Julie Christie, who had been expected to win for "Away From Her."
As a raging, conniving, acquisitive petroleum pioneer caught up in California's oil boom of the early 20th century, Day-Lewis won for a part very different from his role as a writer with cerebral palsy in 1989's "My Left Foot."
"My deepest thanks to the academy for whacking me with the handsomest bludgeon in town," Day-Lewis said.
Day-Lewis walked up the steps to accept his trophy from Helen Mirren, then went down on one knee before her, head bowed. Mirren, last year's best-actress winner for "The Queen," picked up his cue, touching Lewis's Oscar to his shoulders as she would a royal sword.
"That's the closest I'll ever come to getting a knighthood," the Englishman said.
The Coens missed out on a chance to make Oscar history _ four wins for a single film _ when they lost the editing prize, for which they were nominated under the pseudonym Roderick Jaynes.
"The Bourne Ultimatum" won the editing Oscar and swept all three categories in which it was nominated, including sound editing and sound mixing.
Past winners for their screenplay to 1996's "Fargo," Joel and Ethan Coen joined an elite list of filmmakers to win three Oscars in a single night, including Francis Ford Coppola ("The Godfather Part II"), James Cameron ("Titanic") and Billy Wilder ("The Apartment").
Cotillard, the first winner ever for a French-language performance, tearfully thanked her director, Olivier Dahan.
"Maestro Olivier, you rocked my life. You have truly rocked my life," said Cotillard, a French beauty who is a dynamo as Piaf, playing the warbling chanteuse through three decades.
"Thank you, life; thank you, love. And it is true there (are) some angels in this city."
Swinton won her Oscar for playing a conniving attorney who stops at nothing to achieve her goals in a $3 billion class-action lawsuit in "Michael Clayton."
"I have an American agent who is the spitting image of this," said Swinton, fondly looking at her Oscar statuette.
"Really, truly, the same shape head, and it has to be said, the buttocks. And I'm giving this to him, because there's no way I'd be in America at all, ever, on a plane if it wasn't for him," said Swinton, who was born in London into a patrician Scottish military family.
Talking to reporters backstage, Swinton still was in disbelief, saying she initially thought "I heard someone else's name and suddenly, slowly heard my own" when her name was announced.
"I'm still recovering from that moment, and I have absolutely no idea what happened after that," Swinton said. "So, you know, you can tell me my dress fell off and I'd believe you, so don't be cruel."
Bardem won for his fearsome turn in "No Country."
"Thank you to the Coens for being crazy enough to think I could do that and for putting one of the most horrible haircuts in history over my head," said Bardem, referring to the sinister variation of a pageboy bob his character sported.
The biggest commercial success among the best-picture nominees, the $100 million (euro67.5 million) hit "Juno," came away with the original screenplay Oscar for first-time scriptwriter Diablo Cody, who penned whimsically smart dialogue for her cast, led by best-actress nominee Ellen Page as a pregnant teen.
The rat tale "Ratatouille" was named best animated film, the second Oscar win in the category for director Brad Bird.
Glen Hansard of the Irish band the Frames and Marketa Irglova, both non-actors who starred in the musical romance "Once," won the best-song Oscar for "Falling Slowly," one of several tunes they wrote for the film.
"What are we doing here? This is mad," Hansard said, recounting the low-budget history of "Once." "It took us three weeks to make. We made it for a hundred-grand. We never thought we'd come into a room like this and be in front of all you people."
Irglova, a 19-year-old Czech, did not get a chance to speak because the orchestra played after Hansard spoke. She was brought out a second time to make her victory speech.
The documentary prize went to "Taxi to the Dark Side," a war-on-terror chronicle that centers on an innocent Afghan cab driver killed while in detention.
___
On the Net:
Academy Awards:
http://www.oscars.org


Updated : 2021-05-17 11:49 GMT+08:00