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Little Mermaid casting magic over Hsinchu Glassland

Colorful display is the work of a local artist.
Outdoor installation art looks like Mermaid Ariel from Hans Christian Andersen's fairy tale.
Beautiful glass masterpiece glows in the dark at the International Glass Art Pavilion in Hsinchu City.
Glass art blooms in a Hsinchu gallery.
The Little Mermaid done in glass seems to be swimming underwater.
Big and small shells, all made of glass, are displayed in the Mermaid Pavilion.
Visitors at the Hsinchu City International Glass Art Festival can watch a craftsman at the Glass Studio work on a "Little Mermaid" piece.

Colorful display is the work of a local artist.

Outdoor installation art looks like Mermaid Ariel from Hans Christian Andersen's fairy tale.

Beautiful glass masterpiece glows in the dark at the International Glass Art Pavilion in Hsinchu City.

Glass art blooms in a Hsinchu gallery.

The Little Mermaid done in glass seems to be swimming underwater.

Big and small shells, all made of glass, are displayed in the Mermaid Pavilion.

Visitors at the Hsinchu City International Glass Art Festival can watch a craftsman at the Glass Studio work on a "Little Mermaid" piece.

Let beautiful glass art take you to the wonderful world of make-believe.
Once every two years since 1995, the Hsinchu City International Glass Art Festival emerges a crowd-drawer. "Mermaid in a Glass Fairyland" has been capturing the imagination of young and old visitors alike this year. Hans Christian Andersen, the world-famous Danish storyteller, would have been very happy to see how his classic fairy tale about the underwater mermaid who craves to exchange her fins and tail for human feet has inspired creative glass art indoor, outdoor and everywhere.
Overnight the fascinating world under the sea has been recreated in an area only five minutes' walk from the rear exit of the Hsinchu Train Station, reminding all about the dreamland of the daughters of Triton.
The opening of the festival made possible by the Hsinchu Cultural Affairs Bureau with support from the Council for Cultural Affairs saw a whole entourage of dancers, including children, mobilized for casting in the roles of the colorful creatures of the ocean. Those reprising the parts of the mermaid daughters of Triton, namely Aquata, Andrina, Arista, Atina, Adella, Allana, and, of course, Ariel, in a tableau of music and dance braved Hsinchu's windy and cold weather in costumes, which did not keep them warm.
Hsinchu City, known for its glass industry, has over the years built a reputation as home of exquisite and delicate glass art in Taiwan. The festival has been an occasion to highlight international glass art masters side by side with Hsinchu's very own glass-making talents.
Masterpieces by artists from the United States, Germany, Italy, Britain, Australia, Israel, India, and Japan have been a source of visual excitement among the visitors at the International Glass Art Pavilion inside the Hsinchu City Glass Museum.
People going over the glass displays pause to admire the sophistication and refinement of the imported objets d'art. The transparent and translucent colors glow dramatically under controlled lighting.
Taiwan's own glass artists, about 40 of them, have put their works on view in another gallery of the Hsinchu City Glass Museum. Stained glass, working glass in a torch flame, glass casting, and glass blowing - the local craftsmen have experimented with a whole range of techniques to produce glass art.
Two glass pillows look like candies with wrappers twisted at both ends. Chung Kuei, the deity believed to protect man from evil spirits, has a blown-glass version in the exhibition. A tall vase features a drawing of a mermaid. When it is filled with water, the legendary sea creature with a human upper body and a fish's tail conveniently goes underwater.
A tour of the Glass Studio, which is located next to the Hsinchu City Glass Museum, enables visitors to watch craftsmen at work. The artists are more than happy to demonstrate how to work a piece of glass in a torch flame into a multi-colored fish to go with the unfinished Little Mermaid centerpiece. A hands-on experience in crafting a tiny fish out of melting glass, using tongs, is possible for the amateur under the watchful eyes of an expert from Hsinchu.
Individual artists, colleges and universities have been encouraged to create outdoor glass installation art on the theme of "Mermaid in Glassland" this year. These displays lead to the Mermaid Pavilion in what used to be the Weather Station.
The story of "The Little Mermaid" is told chapter by chapter in different rooms. The tour begins on the beach with all kinds of shells, all produced in glass art form. One room looks like Ariel's cavern of treasures.
Hsinchu City takes pride in presenting the Glass Industry Pavilion in a building, which used to be the Broadcasting Corporation of China (BCC) Radio Station. Household glassware, Christmas decorations, stained glass, and even glass curtain invite a closer look. Glass fiber, which is surprisingly soft, arouses curiosity.
Traditional tales about the Year of the Rat find glass interpretations in a section of the Hsinchu City Glass Museum. Fifty-four works here demonstrate the creativity and imagination of the individual talents behind them.
The arrival of the Year of the Rat means that the treasure-bringing rodent more than any other Chinese zodiac animal dominates the souvenir market on Glass Art Street. Shop shelves are filled with glass mice of every imaginable design and shape. Mickey Mouse right out of Disneyland, holding an ancient Chinese gold ingot, is one of the popular items.
The Hsinchu International Glass Art Festival at the Hsinchu Park will run until April 20. A regular ticket to the three pavilions costs NT$120 while a discounted one is priced at NT$80. For further inquiries, call tel. (03)5626091.


Updated : 2021-03-08 11:55 GMT+08:00