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KMT accepts CEC voting method

Opposition party announces it will no longer pursue its 'two-step' polling procedure

KMT accepts CEC voting method

The opposition Kuomintang yesterday decided not to continue insisting on its "two-step" voting format for the upcoming Legislative elections on January 12, saying it would accept the Central Election Commission's modified "one-step" voting format.
Before the KMT made its announcement, the Cabinet sacked two local election commission chairmen in Taipei City and Taichung City, on Thursday and Friday, respectively. Cabinet Spokesman Shieh Jhy-wey (謝志偉) earlier yesterday also confirmed that a third wave of replacements would soon take place on KMT-ruled local governments.
"We are still collecting documents and evidence on any local election commission staff that continue to push for the illegal "two-step" voting procedure, and are making final confirmations regarding the people on the list," Shieh said early yesterday.
Yesterday afternoon, KMT caucus whip Tseng Yung-chuan (曾永權) said that all heads of the 18 KMT-ruled local governments had discussed the controversy surrounding voting procedures, and had come to the decision to accept the CEC's modified "two-step ballots, one-step voting" scheme.
"We made this compromise in order to avoid societal disturbance and chaos, and to help develop Taiwan democracy," Tseng said.
"If there is any chaos during the election, the government should assume full responsibility," Tseng added.
Tseng described the government's move to sack local election commission chairmen as violating the Constitution, and likened the government's behavior to martial law in Taiwan.
Though the KMT said that they would compromise by accepting the CEC's "modified" voting scheme, the voting format has not undergone any modification since the CEC first introduced it on November 16.
On November 16, CEC members held a meeting to discuss the "one-step" and "two-step" voting methods that were favored by the pan-green and pan-blue camps, respectively.
During that meeting, CEC members decided that voters would receive their ballots at two different tables - one table for the Legislative election and the other for the referendums - and that voters would cast all ballots into corresponding ballot boxes after making their votes.
The CEC called this a "two-step ballot, one-step voting" procedure, but it is more commonly referred to as the "one-step" voting method.
Before controversy arose between parties and before the CEC's November 16 meeting, the cabinet had proposed a more thorough "one-step" voting scheme, which called for voters to receive all ballots at a single table. Some officials also proposed that all the candidate names and referendums be printed on a single ballot.
However, the CEC on November 16 issued a "compromise" between the differing voting methods proposed by the pan-green and pan-blue camps.
In response to the CEC ruling, the KMT assumed a tough stance and on November 20 gathered its 18 KMT-ruled local governments together to reject the CEC's "one-step" voting procedure.


Updated : 2021-04-18 16:43 GMT+08:00