Alexa

Fujimori tells court that he 'saved Peru'

Fujimori tells court that he 'saved Peru'

Former President Alberto Fujimori, on trial for murder and kidnapping, told the court on Friday that he "saved Peru" by stamping out a bloody Maoist rebel movement.
Fujimori is facing up to 30 years in prison for allegedly ordering the 1991 military death-squad killings of 15 people at a barbecue in Lima's Barrios Altos neighborhood and the 1992 slayings of nine students and a professor at Lima's La Cantuta University.
Fujimori, 69, has repeatedly denied that he authorized human rights violations during his 1990 to 2000 government.
"It was total chaos," Fujimori said on Friday. "That's why I say this out loud: I saved Peru."
Earlier this week, Fujimori told the court that if there were abuses during his administration, they were isolated acts and not his responsibility.
Fujimori has denied having any knowledge of the death squad's activities, and has said he never authorized Vladimiro Montesinos, his now-jailed intelligence chief, to lead a dirty war against the Marxist Shining Path rebels.
On Friday, Tomas Livias, who was paralyzed from the waist down after he was shot 27 times in the 1991 Barrios Altos massacre, testified Friday that he received death threats "all the time," after the slayings, warning him not to speak out against Fujimori.
Livias said that two men visited him in the hospital where he was recovering after the massacre and offered him bribes.
He said the pair told him that if he did not speak against Fujimori, the president would "take care of all your needs."
In 2000, Fujimori fled to Japan, where his parents were born, as his government collapsed amid a corruption scandal involving Montesinos. He flew to Chile in 2005 in an apparent attempt to stage a return to Peruvian politics.
Chile instead extradited him to Peru in September to stand trial on corruption and human rights abuse charges.