Alexa

In Brief

In Brief

Hicks released from Australian prison
ADELAIDE, Australia
David Hicks, an Australian former kangaroo skinner who is the only person convicted on terrorism charges at a U.S. military tribunal at Guantanamo Bay, walked free yesterday after more than six years behind bars.
The 32-year-old was released from prison in Adelaide. In a statement he thanked supporters and said he did not want to do "anything that might result in my return there ... I would like to recognize the huge debt of gratitude that I owe the Australian public for getting me home," Hicks said in the statement. "I will not forget, or let you down."
Wild weather warning
BRISBANE, Australia
Authorities evacuated campers and closed beaches yesterday as forecasters predicted wild weather and waves up to six meters could pummel the region.
A tropical cyclone bearing winds of up to 120 kilometers per hour was approaching the coast of the remote Pilbara region in Australia's northwest, the Bureau of Meteorology said.
Residents were warned to expect heavy rain and winds today that could cause damage as the storm, named Cyclone Melanie, moves toward the coast.
Sole Panama survivor
DAVID, Panama
The 12-year-old U.S. girl who was the sole survivor of a small plane crash in remote mountains of western Panama remembers very little of the ordeal that killed three others, including her best friend, her uncle said Friday.
Francesca "is in extraordinary shape," he said. "She has some small bruises, lacerations, but otherwise" is OK." She could be released in the next several days, he said.
Zoo's future uncertain
SAN FRANCISCO, California
The deadly tiger escape at the San Francisco Zoo could prove to be a costly blow to an institution that has come under fire repeatedly in just the past few years over the deaths of two elephants and the mauling of a zookeeper.
The zoo could face heavy fines from regulators. It could even face criminal charges, depending on what the investigation finds.
"Whether the zoo can stay open is a big question," an analyst said.
New York murder rate
NEW YORK, New York
Chicago and New York are about to close out 2007 with the lowest number of homicides in more than 40 years, while cities such as Baltimore, Atlanta and Miami have seen killings go up because of what police say is a surge in guns and gang violence.
New York City is on track to have the lowest number of killings since reliable record-keeping started in 1963.