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Poor attitude tied to unemployment among graduates

Students urged to learn to be team players, develop interpersonal skills while in school

Poor attitude tied to unemployment among graduates

The trend of a high number of unemployed university graduates has much to do with attitude when job hunting, according to a survey released yesterday.
National Taiwan Normal University's Center for Educational Research yesterday released the results of a survey on the relationship between the education policy and the high rate of unemployment among people with a graduate degree.
The survey found that 74 percent of the respondents thought that the attitude of people with higher education is the main factor behind the high unemployment rate among the group. Over 30 percent of the respondents said that not enough attention was being paid to the quality of higher education, and that this was the reason behind the high jobless rate among higher education graduates.
The survey also found that 56 percent of the respondents did not think that holding a higher education diploma makes it easier to find a good job.
More than 70 percent of the respondents indicated that the unemployment problem among the graduates of higher education programs was a major one, while 56 percent said that even though they may not be able to find jobs after they graduate, they still think that a university education is a must.
Commenting on the survey, Shen Shan-shan, a professor at National Hsinchu University of Education, said that in the past, the most important asset job applicants could have was a university diploma. However, with more people now gaining access to higher education, employers recruiting new staff members should shift focus from academic qualifications to work attitude and ability.
She urged the public not to assess university graduates based on educational status, but rather to accept the concept that in Taiwan everyone has the right to higher education.
Shen also urged that students try to acquire other assets, such as interpersonal skills and teamwork experience, while pursuing higher education in school.
Hung Sheng-hui, a graduate student at NTNU, said some of the people who hold higher diplomas have been spoiled by their families since they were little, and that they often think too much of themselves and do not want to take any job they do not consider ideal or perfect for them.
The center interviewed people aged 20 to 65 via a computer-assisted telephone interview system from November 20 to November 22 and collected a total of 1,105 effective samples. The margin of error in the survey was plus or minus 2.9 percentage points, with a confidence level of 95 percent.


Updated : 2021-01-18 19:14 GMT+08:00