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Museums

Museums

National Museum of History 國立歷史博物館 (49 Nan Hai Road, Taipei City 台北市南海路四十九號; Tel: 02-2361-0270) The Beauty of Taiwanese Puppetry is on display until April 27, 2008. Taiwanese artifacts are one of the main focuses of the Museum’s research and acquisition activities. The Museum has been assigned an independent exhibition hall that particularly displays various themes and faces of Taiwanese culture since 2005, to offer a historical perspective on early Taiwan immigrants’ lives, in the hope of stimulating more positive attitudes toward preserving, renovating, and growing our own local cultural heritage. Puppet shows were once a very popular form of entertainment for ordinary people, and were later transformed from a traditional mobile form to TV drama series, and are even formally staged in theaters. These different forms adapt various cultural elements and techniques for use with glove puppetry, making it possible to attract new generations and continue to refine the genre’s development. The puppets on show are from the Museum’s collection, which were mainly made in a traditional way around the late nineteenth century in Quanzhou, Fujian province, China. There are also “golden light” puppets on show, which represented a fashion of the 1950s and were bigger in size and more grotesque in shape. The art of glove puppet performance integrates many intricate components, such as face carving and painting, costume embroidery, decorations and special effects of stage settings, and character interpretation by the puppeteers. In addition to the visual and aural enjoyment that they provide, puppet performances reflect social values and performing trends as well. In recent years, awareness of the need to revitalize and preserve local heritage has caused puppetry to regain the public’s attention, and in 1985 the Folk Art Heritage Awards were established by the Ministry of Education to honor outstanding folk-art masters and encourage younger generation to get involved in their arts. The Museum is holding this exhibition in fulfillment of its mission to preserve cultural heritage, and sincerely appreciates the contributions of many enthusiastic experts in sharing their expertise: the Se Den Society Foundation, Mr. Hsu Wang of the Hsiao Hsi Yuan Puppet Theater, Mr. Zhong Ren-Bi of the Hsin Hsing Ku Puppet Show Troupe, and Mr. Jiang Wu-Chang. With this beautiful show, we hope that Taiwanese glove puppetry will become more greatly cherished and secure a future of prosperous development. Opening hours are 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. (closed on Mondays). Tickets are NT$20 and NT$10.
Children’s Art Museum in Taiwan(No.20, Lane 50, Tianmu W. Rd., Shilin District, Taipei City 台北市天母西路50巷20號B1; Tel: 02-2872-1366 ext.14, 23) Forest of Forms is on display. To faithfully record the nature was considered art’s highest achievement for a long period of time of art history. But the invention of the camera in 19tth century entirely changed the value of artistic creativity. The function of camera and the realism has been replaced. Modern art has abandoned the drawing and copying of the nature. Experimentation with form has become a primary mode of contemporary visual art and creativity.The life of art came from the changes of form.Nature’s forms have been replaced by forms created by human imagination. Basic forms and structures can be identified in every creature and object. Artists identify these basic structural and formal elements, submitting them to manipulation and transformation. “Form” becomes a verb. “To form” becomes the focal point in artists’ creative process. Opening hours are 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. (Closed on Mondays)
National Dr. Sun Yat-sen Memorial Hall 國父紀念館 (505, Jen-ai Rd, Sec. 4, Taipei 台北市信義區仁愛路4段505號; Tel:02-2758-8008) Commemorating Master Hwang Jun-Bi 110 Years Anniversary Chinese Painting Exhibition is on display at Chung-shan National Gallery (2F) until January 2. The First Time Lawyers’, Architects’, Accountants’ and Doctors’ Associations Artworks Joint Display will run at Yat-sen Gallery (3F; East) until December 30. Chen Ching-Kun Ink Color Painting “Landscape” Exhibition runs at Yat-sen Gallery (3F; East) from December 29 to January 6. Yang Siou-Ying “Taiwan Easy Go” Ink Painting Personal Exhibition will be on display at Tswei-heng Gallery (B1) until January 6. Yang Shu-Fang Ink Color Personal Exhibition will be on display at Tzai-chih Room (B1) until January 6. Taipei Johuei 50 Years Anniversary One of Series Activities -Display on Literature and Articlewill run at East & West Corridors (2F) until January 6. Praise for Motherland - Mo Yan Painting Society Joint Display will run at Tswei-Xi Gallery (B1) until January 6. Opening hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
The Gold Ecological Park, Jinguashi (No. 8, Jinglang Rd., Ruefang Township, Taipei County; Tel: 02-2496-2800; website: http://www.gep.tpc.gov.tw) The Special Exhibition of Triangle Rush in Exquisite Weaving runs at Living Art Experience Workshop (Four Joined Japanese-Style Residence) until December 30.Triangle rush weaving had been a successful handcraft in Yuanli while the mining industry of Jinguashi had left its own legacy in Taiwan in the post-Japanese colonial period. The glory of triangle rush weaving has since faded, and weaving is no longer a family tradition in Yuanli, but the remembrance of this skill remains in mind of generations. Therefore, the preservation of traditional weaving culture of triangle rush helps revive this art form. The weavers use their 30 to 40 years memories to go back to their childhoods, and they have threaded through the past to present by looping and weaving on the triangle rush. The promotion of triangle rush becomes various and this new program last this mouth-to-mouth handcraft forever. Contemporary Metal Crafts Special Exhibition - The language of metal artists runs on the 2F, Museum of Gold, until June 1, 2008. Since records of mining at Jinguashi began, it has been an important part in the development of the precious metals mining industry of South East Asia. Resources were exhausted and the mining industry declined but this period of history still remains in memories. However, metals continue to exist in and, every moment, enriches people’s lives . For this, the GEP(Gold Ecological Park) has given metal artists a space in which to freely express themselves, use metals as language and tell us about the development of metals in the contemporary era. Metals have a cold, hard surface, rich color changes and malleability, the unlimited changes enchant many people. Metal craft artists use the properties of various metals to brilliant effect, using metals as language, telling stories about his beautiful world. Opening hours are 9:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. from Tuesdays to Fridays and 9:30 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.on Saturdays and Sundays.
Shihsanhang Museum of Archeology (No.200, Museum Rd., Bali Township, Taipei County; Tel: 02-2619-1313) “Back to Shihsanhang,”a permanent exhibition, is on display now. As visitors stand outside queuing for tickets, looking at the impressive external structure of the Shihsanhang Museum of Archaeology, they have unbeknownst to themselves already entered the “Return to Shihsanhang Permanent Exhibition.” Indeed, the two distinct groups of buildings represent land and sea. In addition, the slightly slanted posture of the specially designed octagonal tower and the surface of the high exposed concrete walls allude to the inability to recreate the Shihsanhang Site and the need to conduct a conduct a “rescue excavation.” The exhibition area is arranged like a theater production, whereby visitors are invited into Shihsanhang to experience things on a more personal level. Naturally enough, the main focus of the various exhibitions is the display of items unearthed at the Shihsanhang Site, including the unique “Anthropomorphic Jar” used by the Museum as its logo.
Museum of World Religions 世界宗教博物館 (7F., No.236, Sec. 1, Zhongshan Rd., Yonghe City, Taipei County 台北縣永和市中山路一段 236號7樓; Tel: 02-8231-6118; Web: www.mwr.org.tw/) To April 27, 2008: A painting, A Story: Adoration of Shepherds. To December 31: Kidsland: A Quest for Miracle in the Loving Forest (愛的森林尋找米洛可) . The spacious Children’s Museum inside the Museum of World Religions is holding an interactive exhibition Kidsland: A Quest for Miracle in the Loving Forest offering an adventurous tour for children from three to ten years old. Entering the enchantingly-decorated space in the museum, visitors will be taken on a journey of semi-reality that takes place inside a forest.
National Taiwan Museum 國立臺灣博物館 (No.2, Siangyang Rd., Taipei City 台北市中正區襄陽路二號; Tel: 02-2382-2699) .To January 6, 2008: Czech Puppetry.
National Palace Museum 國立故宮博物院 (No. 221 Chih-shan Rd., Sec. 2, Taipei台北市至善路二段221號) Heaven-Sent Conveyances: Highlights of Ch'ing Historical Documents is on display at Gallery 103 In the last few years, there have been quite a few Ch'ing-period television dramas in Taiwan, and the phones at the National Palace Museum are always ringing with people wanting to know the answers to questions such as, "Did the Dowager Empress Hsiao-chuang really marry below her station to Prince Regent Dorgon?" "Who did the K'ang-hsi Emperor really intend as his heir?" "Did the Yung-cheng Emperor actually review memorials from dusk till dawn?" "Is it true that the Ch'ien-lung Emperor was born into the Ch'en family of Hai-ning?" and "What do imperial edicts and palace memorials with vermilion rescripts actually look like?" Researchers in the Books and Documents Department do their best to answer each question and also develop exhibitions to educate the public about Ch'ing dynasty history. With this in mind, the permanent exhibition of "Treasures Among Ch'ing Historical Documents" is presented to the public. Through the rich collection of artifacts in the Museum collection, it is hoped that viewers may develop a greater and more direct understanding of China's last imperial dynasty. Due to limitations of gallery space, and for conservation purposes, the documents on display are changed every three months. They are divided into the following four sections; "Imperial Mandates: Proclamations of the Emperor", "Memorials, Their Copies, and Archives", "Official Documents and Historiographical Compilations", and "Archival and Illustrated Materials on Taiwan Aborigines". Chang Dai-chi’en Residence (Permanent Exhibit) is on display at Chang Dai-chi’en Residence. Chang Dai-ch’ien was born in Nei-chiang, Szechwan province, in 1899, and died in 1983 at the age of 85. As a painter he had his own unique style and was one of the greatest painters in the history of modern art. Moreover there are many legendary anecdotes from his life such as having studied textile dyeing in Japan and having joined a Buddhist monastery as a monk, and having journeyed to Tun-huang during wartime to make copies of the cave paintings. Arts from the Ch’ing Imperial Collection (permanent exhibit) is on display at Gallery 106. Practiced more than a thousand years, traditional Chinese imperial examination system came to an end in 1904 with the education reforms as part of modernization efforts at the end of the Ch’ing dynasty. Splendors of Ch’ing Furniture (1800-1911) is on display at gallery 108: This permanent exhibit demonstrates furniture as an art form combining both aesthetic with pragmatic qualities. Like the features of one’s face, once the location and features of the eyes and mouth have been established, a whole range of beauty, expression, and emotion becomes possible within a limited space. The development of Chinese furniture reached its apex approximately between the 15th and 17th centuries. Charioting in the Shang Dynasty: Artifacts from the Horse-and-Chariot Pits at Hsiao-t’un is on display at gallery 304. This permanent exhibit demonstrates an archaeological collection of the country’s most prestigious research organization the Academia Sinica. The T’ien-lu Lin-lang Library: Treasured Rare Books of the Ch’ing Inner Court is on display until June 30, 2008. This established a new system for editing followed by subsequent compilers of book catalogues. The Chao-jen Hall, located east of the Ch’ien-ch’ing Palace, was the special repository for the “T’ien-lu lin-lang” library. Originally the site of the K’ang-hsi Emperor’s (r. 1662-1722) daily activities and studies, the Chao-jen Hall was also where his grandson, the future Ch’ien-lung Emperor, studied. Steeped in this atmosphere of learning, Ch’ien-lung naturally came to enjoy studying and researching ancient books. Not long after becoming emperor, his “assembled gems of rare books” were placed here, which he gave the name “T’ien-lu lin-lang.” It thus became the library of valuable and rare “antique books” at the Ch’ing inner court. Books originally were meant to collect and transmit ideas and information in written form. Ancient books, however, often possess unique forms of printing and binding different from modern texts. Combined with the fragility of paper and difficulty of preservation, ancient books not only became collectibles, but also quite limited in number.Details see web stie: www.npm.gov.tw/. Open: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Sundays to Fridays; 5 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. on Saturdays. Admissions: NT$ 160.
Taipei Fine Arts Museum 台北市立美術館 (No. 181-1, Zhong-shan N. Road, Sec. 3, Taipei 台北市中山北路三段181之一號; Tel:02-2587-5565) Still Life runs until February 10, 2008 and highlights artworks by the existing artists in Taiwan since the 20th century.
National Taiwan Museum 國立台灣博物館 No.2, Xiangyang Rd., Zhongzheng District, Taipei City 台北市中正區襄陽路二號 (02)2382-2699 Web: http://www.ntm.gov.tw/ Open: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Tuesdays to Sundays Admissions: NT$10 - NT$20 Taiwan’s Pre-history Culture and Traditional Cultures of the Indigenous People is on display. This permanent exhibit comprises twelve themes, the first is the transition from the Paleolithic Age to the Iron Age, with an exhibition of the most ancient (dated back several thousand years ago) fossilized human remains found in Taiwan- “Tsuo Chen Man”-, cultural artifacts from the various stages of the Neolithic Age found in Western Taiwan, the specialty of the “Peinan Culture” -stone coffins and burial artifacts- found in the Neolithic Age in the eastern part of the island and ironware from the “Shih San Hang” culture. Other eleven themes features the Pingpu (plain-aboriginals), Atayal, Bunun, Saisiyat, Tsou, Paiwan, Rukai, Puyuma, Amis, Yami and Thao tribes.
Juming Museum 朱銘美術館 (No.2, She-shi-hu, Jinshan Township, Taipei County台北縣金山鄉西勢湖2號; Tel: 02-2498-9940) The Living World Series–Armed Forces人間系列:三軍is on display unitil December 31. It presents over 300 sculptures of gallant soldiers to pay tribute to Taiwan’s three armed forces and war heroes. These man-size sculptures are mostly made of bronze, enhanced with different color paintings to showcase the diversity of warfare and military actions.
Taiwan Theater Museum 台灣戲劇館 (No.1, Xianzheng N. Rd., Yilan City, Yilan County宜蘭市凱旋里三鄰縣政北路一號; Tel:03-925-1000) The Godfather of Pu Ma Chen – A Tribute to Lin Long-chun is on display until December 31. Pu Ma Chen (or Clothes-made Horse Formation, 布馬陣) is a traditional Taiwanese folk festival parade common in the Yilan area (宜蘭). Unlike a different kind of Taiwanese folk parade, Bamboo Horse Formation (竹馬陣), in which dancers ride horses made of bamboo, the horses used in Pu Ma Chen are made out of clothes. Admission is free. Opening hours are 9 p.m. to 5 p.m., everyday.
National Center for Traditional Arts 國立傳統藝術中心 (201, Sec. 2, Wubin Rd., Jisin Village, Wujie Township, Yilan County 宜蘭縣五結鄉季新村五濱路二段201號; Tel: 03-9705-815) Wu Ching Gold Sculptures in Progress 吳卿金雕展 is on display until June 30, 2008. Renowned Taiwanese sculpture artist Wu Ching (吳卿), well-known for using gold in making sculptures, has been creating the artworks since March, and is expected to finish the whole series before next July. A new exhibition will be held after the completion of all the gold creations. Admission is free. Opening hours are 9 p.m. to 6 p.m. everyday.


Updated : 2021-01-23 00:01 GMT+08:00