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Most Taiwanese support U.N. vote, survey finds

Most Taiwanese support U.N. vote, survey finds

Nearly 80 percent of the people of Taiwan support the government's plan to hold a referendum on Taiwan's access to the United Nations under the name of Taiwan, despite China's exertion of pressure via the United States to force Taiwan to drop the plan, according to a recent poll conducted by the Cabinet-level Mainland Affairs Council.
The findings were based on responses from 1,067 respondents to a poll conducted by a private polling company between December 21 and 23 after U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice reiterated Washington's opposition to the referendum.
Among those polled, 77.8 percent said they would not oppose the government's plan to hold a referendum on Taiwan's bidding for U.N. membership, in spite of China's pressure on Taiwan via the United States.
A MAC senior official said the poll results shows that most people in Taiwan wish to show the world their determination to enter the U.N. through democratic and peaceful procedures, and their dissatisfaction with the unreasonable treatment they have received in the international community.
The poll may also serve to remind U.S. policymakers in Washington that they should not lean toward China in dealing with cross-strait relations, and that the people of Taiwan are seeking to play a more active role in the international community, said MAC Vice Chairman Liu Te-hsun.
Asked if Taiwan should seek independence, maintain the status quo, or unify with China, 44.9 percent of the respondents said they favored maintaining the status quo, so that they may decide whether to seek independence or unification with China in the future, 20.6 percent supported maintaining the status quo indefinitely, while 19.1 percent said they favored Taiwan declaring independence or seeking independence in the future.
Some 66.8 percent of those polled concluded that the mainland authorities were "unfriendly" to the Taiwan government, while 50.6 percent said the authorities were "unfriendly" to the people of Taiwan. These responses represent new highs this year, Liu said.
For the first time, less than half of the people polled approved of the government's restrictions on investments in China by Taiwan businessmen, but 44.3 percent maintained that stricter restrictions were necessary to preserve Taiwan's economic strength, as compared with 37.7 percent who favored loosening such restrictions.
Liu said fewer people in Taiwan have become less supportive of the government's stringent control of Taiwan's investments in China because of the legislation of a series of bills regulating cross-strait investment activities and the government's initiative in communicating with Taiwan businessmen operating in China to help them resolve their problems.
Asked if the government should continue to promote relations with other countries, even if doing so would escalate cross-strait tensions, 68.3 percent said yes, while 30.8 percent suggested that the government pay equal attention to promoting relations with other countries as with China.
Of those polled, 40.7 percent said the government's pace of promoting cross-strait exchanges was "fine," but 32.2 percent said it was "too slow," and 18.6 percent said it was "too fast."
Asked if they would accept "one country, two systems" as a solution to the cross-strait issue, 71.2 percent said they were opposed to the idea, while 17.6 percent said they supported it.


Updated : 2021-08-02 08:11 GMT+08:00