Alexa

Skydiving Dragons Show Their Stuff

Skydiving Dragons Show Their Stuff

As part of the mid-November National Defense Education Expanded Awareness Activities, the superb high-altitude parachuting technique of the Army's Airborne Brigade Skydiving Team won strong praise from the public. Those intrepid airborne recruits who want to wear the insignia of the Airborne Brigade Skydiving Team on their arm must first undergo 70 hours of ground training and 60 high-altitude independent parachute jumps. As a result, members of the team possess extraordinary daring, willpower and the ability to keep cool in stressful situations.
All team members must undergo rigorous training before they are qualified to make parachute jumps. Their training regimen includes basic parachute training consisting of 56 hours of ground training and five jumps, and only trainees who pass can go on to high-altitude parachute training. High-altitude parachute training is divided into three stages: The first stage is ground training, which includes posture training. Beginners must learn to use their limbs to stay balanced and keep their center of gravity stable, allowing the body to fall at an angle or rotate. Apart from posture training, trainees must also undergo training on a jumping board and a dive tower, as well as with swimming and parachute control and folding. The most important thing is fitness training. A skydiver's harness and primary and secondary parachutes weigh more than 12 kilograms. A skydiver must carry these parachutes and equipment onto a plane, undergo the jolts of takeoff, immediately adjust to air pressure and temperature after jumping out a plane and withstand the jolt when the parachute inflates. A skydiver must also have the strength to manipulate a parachute while aloft and must have the leg strength to withstand the impact of landing. Each of a skydiver's actions are closely interconnected. A skydiver must therefore constantly engage in physical training in order to maintain the strength needed for successful parachute jumps.
After ground training is completed, trainees immediately board an airplane and experience high-altitude skydiving. The skydivers begin their jumps at an altitude of 4,000 feet. After they start opening parachutes themselves, their instructor will assess their performance and increase the time to open a parachute from five seconds to eight, 10, 12, 15 and 20 seconds based on their stability. After a skydiver can fall in a stable position for 20 seconds and has done 60 jumps, that person can complete the first stage of training and be promoted as a formal member of the team.
Next time you watch the skydivers' breathtaking performance, make sure to give them a hearty round of applause to let them feel your appreciation.