Alexa
  • Directory of Taiwan

Taiwan's ruling party to decide its position on island's independence

Taiwan's ruling party to decide its position on island's independence

Taiwan's ruling Democratic Progressive Party holds a congress on Sunday to resolve disputes over how far it should go in pushing for the island's independence.
The congress comes ahead of a presidential election next March in which the DPP is expected to emphasize Taiwan's sovereignty and its rejection of unification with the mainland, from which the island separated during a civil war in 1949.
After months of debate within the party, President Chen Shui-bian and other DPP leaders endorsed a draft resolution this past week that calls for a new national constitution and general use of "Taiwan" as the country's name, without specifically abolishing its current formal name, the Republic of China.
The draft disappointed many pro-independence DPP hard-liners, who had hoped the resolution would function as a declaration of independence by calling for the jettisoning of the official name.
Following the endorsement of the milder version, Yu Shyi-kun resigned as DPP chairman, saying the party should adopt a formal goal of having Taiwan declare independence.
But Chen and several other DPP leaders want to keep Taiwan's status ambiguous, fearing that uncompromising language could hurt the chances of DPP candidate Frank Hsieh in the March 2008 presidential election.
China views Taiwan as part of its territory and has threatened war if it declares formal independence.
Many Taiwanese voters fear changing the island's official name to Taiwan could provoke China to launch a military attack.
Party delegates are to decide the final wording of the resolution on Sunday.
DPP lawmaker Wang Tou urged a compromise on the resolution.
"Our goal is the same and it is just a matter of the timing of its implementation," Wang said.


Updated : 2021-10-16 21:08 GMT+08:00