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Serena Williams reprimanded by chair umpire _ for reading

Serena Williams reprimanded by chair umpire _ for reading

Serena Williams received a reprimand at the U.S. Open. For reading, of all things.
The eight-time major champion is in the habit of bringing notes to read during changeovers. She's done it for years _ she used to just take pieces of paper, then lost them so often that she bought a notebook.
During Williams' 6-4, 7-6 (4) win over Vera Zvonareva on Friday, chair umpire Damian Steiner told Williams to put away the notebook, as if she were carrying cheat sheets to a test in school.
"He told me I couldn't use my notes," Williams said after reaching the fourth round. "I was like, 'Well, it's not like I'm Harry Potter and my dad can magically give me notes to read.' It's something that I write myself. Just little things. What if I were to take a paper on the court and write something, what's the difference?"
It is not against the rules at all to read something carried out to the match. And, indeed, Steiner eventually relented.
"Players can read whatever they want to read on the changeover _ as long as they haven't received anything from anywhere else," tournament referee Brian Earley said. "A ball kid hands them a note _ that would be construed as coaching. But there's nothing to prevent a player from opening a book that she brought with her."
Williams certainly is not the first player to be spotted reading during changeovers.
Former world No. 1 Jim Courier once read Armistead Maupin's "Maybe the Moon" during the brief breaks, saying the book was too good to put down.
Pete Sampras, a 14-time Grand Slam champion, read notes from his wife during matches. And at this Open, wild-card Ahsha Rolle read notes that she keeps in a Bible.
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GO FISH:@ After American Mardy Fish squandered a 4-1 lead in the fifth set, he took all the blame for failing to upset eighth-seeded Tommy Robredo.
Fish saved two match points to win the fourth set tiebreaker, but lost the final five games and fell 6-4, 3-6, 6-4, 6-7 (7), 6-4.
"Credit to him, he stepped up his game," Fish said. "But, I mean, I froze. Against top-10 players, top-eight players in the world, you just can't freeze like that.
"I think a lot had to do with nerves."
Fish, who lost almost the entire 2005 season because of two wrist surgeries, took exception to a comment that this type of match has typified his time on tour.
"You want me to say that's what my career is like? My career is like getting there really close and then coming up short," he said, clearly annoyed. "I'm only 25 years old."
Fish has won two career titles, at Stockholm in 2003 and Houston in 2006. His best Grand Slam result has been reaching the Australian Open quarterfinals this year.
In eight appearances at the U.S. Open, he's never gone beyond the second round.
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END OF THE ROLLE:@ Ahsha Rolle's nice run at the U.S. Open came to an end on Friday, but the 22-year-old American was still bubbling about reaching the third round.
A wild-card recipient, she had never before won a match at a Grand Slam before this week.
Rolle upset 17th-seeded Tatiana Golovin of France in the first round and beat Karin Knapp of Italy in the second round. She lost to No. 15 Dinara Safina of Russia 6-4, 6-3.
"It's definitely a huge confidence booster," Rolle said. "It just gives me confidence to know I can play with the top players, beat them."
Rolle is the third of five children for Leon, a retired attorney, and Sharon, who withdrew her retirement savings when she was a pharmaceutical representative to finance her daughter's desire to play tennis.
In 2005, the U.S. Tennis Association started offering some assistance to Rolle. Prior to that, she said the family was spending between $30,000 (euro22,000) and $50,000 (euro36,500) for her training.
Ranked No. 109 coming into the U.S. Open, Rolle will definitely crack the top 100. She could journey as high as the mid-80s when the new rankings come out after the tournament.
"Hopefully, I'll finally be top 100," she said. "I've been trying to get that all year."
Lacking sponsors, Rolle wore the same shirt that she washed after every match _ the top had a rhinestone decoration of the New York skyline that a seamstress in Miami designed.
Rolle said she had no special plans for the $43,000 (euro31,375) singles prize money she earned.
"Got to go pay some bills," she said.
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CROWD PLEASERS:@ The U.S. Open is drawing fans at a record rate _ so many that there was a traffic jam Friday.
Because two afternoon matches ran long, including Serena Williams' two-hour victory over Vera Zvonareva, the crowd at Arthur Ashe Stadium was late emptying out. That meant thousands of fans had to stand outside the gates to get in for the night session, which started with Venus Williams playing Alona Bondarenko.
In all, a day-night combined record of 60,836 fans were at the National Tennis Center on Friday, breaking the record of 60,619 set on Tuesday.
The Open is sold out through Monday night, and officials are predicting an overall attendance record of more than 700,000.
Wild-card Ahsha Rolle, who won two matches, noted what it means to play in New York.
"They're always kind of noises. You got fans screaming, saying different things, people walking during points," the 22-year-old American said. "I love it. I mean, all those fans were so out there for me, screaming my name."


Updated : 2021-08-04 21:50 GMT+08:00