Alexa

Feeding bottles tested for contaminant

Feeding bottles tested for contaminant

The Environmental Quality Protection Foundation yesterday announced that results of its test on "leachable Bisphenol in baby bottles on the market," which showed that 16 different kinds of baby bottles of the 19 tested did not contain Bisphenol A.
Chairman of the EQPF Liou Ming-long said Bisphenol A is primarily used in the production of polycarbonate plastic, which is used in many consumer products, including shatter-resistant baby bottles, toys, and water and food containers.
Bisphenol A is known to be an estrogen receptor agonist that can activate estrogen receptors leading to physiological effects similar to the body's own estogens, Liu said. He added that in 2007, 38 scientists in the United States claimed that exposure to Bisphenol A from polycarbonate-containing consumer products poses a potential health risk to organs of the reproductive system, especially to babies and fetuses.
Known to leach
The EQPF tested two baby bottles for each of the 19 different brands on the market, from June to September 2006, and test results showed that 16 out of the 19 did not contain Bisphenol A, Liu said.
Authorities in Taiwan have not stipulated the standards for the level of leachable Bisphenol A, and the EQPA's announcement of 16 brands of baby bottles that passed the EQPA tests can serve as a guide to parents, Liu said.
The 16 brands include PENGO, Ai-NON BABY, PIGEON, NUK, Snoopy, Chicco, AVENT, CHU and Combi.
Bisphenol A has been known to leach from the plastic lining of food cans and, to a lesser degree, certain plastics that are cleaned with harsh detergents or are used as containers for acidic or high-temperature liquids.
Yong-Chien Ling, a professor of chemistry at the National Tsing Hua University, advised parents against using PC food containers or bottles, heating food in these kinds of containers, and using high efficiency detergents or hot water to clean the bottles.