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Indonesia seeks ways to save Sumatran elephants, tigers from extinction

Indonesia seeks ways to save Sumatran elephants, tigers from extinction

Efforts to save Sumatran elephants and tigers from extinction gathered steam in Indonesia on Friday, with government officials and experts vowing to find ways to protect the species' dwindling habitat from loggers and farmers.
More than 100 people were taking part in the three-day meeting that wraps up Friday.
"There is a very real danger that Sumatran elephants (and tigers) could become extinct in our lifetime if we don't come to agreement at this workshop," said Christy Williams of the World Wildlife Fund.
"We need to decide what areas need to remain natural forests and how to go about making sure they are not touched."
Satellite images show that 8 million hectares (20 million acres) of Sumatra island's remaining lowland tropical forest _ the animals' primary habitat _ were lost to development from 1990 to 2000, conservationists say.
They estimate that there are only 2,400 to 2,800 Sumatran elephants left in the world, and no more than 400 tigers.
The meeting in Padang, West Sumatra, was significant because it was organized by the Indonesian government and brought together local officials, aid workers, international and local scientists, and members of the business community.
Hariyo Wibisono of the Wildlife Conservation Society said it was important "to bring all the stakeholders together ... to coordinate their efforts and take concrete actions to lift the threat to the species," from logging and farming to poaching and conflict with humans.
Participants were expected to release an action plan later Friday.


Updated : 2021-03-01 04:03 GMT+08:00