Alexa

Tribal kings in remote Indian state give environmental award to Al Gore

Tribal kings in remote Indian state give environmental award to Al Gore

A group of tribal kings and chieftains from a remote corner of India that is one of the rainiest places on Earth have chosen former U.S. Vice President Al Gore for their first "global award" for bringing attention to the dangers of climate change, a tribal leader said Thursday.
More than 3,000 kings, chieftains and elders from Meghalaya, a northeastern state, decided to give Gore the award after watching his Academy Award-winning documentary, "An Inconvenient Truth."
"We consider Al Gore a champion for putting the issue of climate change on the world's radar," said Robert Kharshiing, chairman of the group, the Grassroots Democracy Advisory Council, and a member of India's Parliament. "We want the world to know that our tiny state can face disastrous consequences too."
The leaders say there has been significantly less rain in recent years in Cherrapunji and Mawsynram, towns which usually receive as much as 12 meters (40 feet) each year. They worry that the area's natural history of heavy rainfall has been disrupted, and global warming is to blame.
"The threat to Meghalaya is real," Kharshiing said.
This year's rainfall statistics were not available.
The tribal leaders have planned a ceremony on Oct. 6 to honor Gore in a sacred forest in the village of Mawphlang, near the state capital of Shillong.
The council invited Gore to the ceremony, which will take place during a "people's parliament" that is expected to attract 300,000 people, but he has not said whether he will attend.
"We have since received a reply from Mr. Gore's office saying he was very humbled hearing about the decision of people far away to confer him with the award," Kharshiing said.


Updated : 2021-03-05 15:45 GMT+08:00