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Former sprinter Carl Lewis: Gay ran a great race

Former sprinter Carl Lewis: Gay ran a great race

Carl Lewis has great memories of his performance at the 1991 worlds championships in Tokyo.
The former track star just doesn't like to discuss them.
"I don't mean it to sound demeaning, but my time has passed," Lewis said Wednesday. "It really isn't about me at all. It's about all these athletes."
Being an elite 100 runner, Lewis was asked about Tyson Gay, who won the 100 on Sunday night and will later go for another gold in the 200.
"I really don't talk about other people," Lewis said. "But he ran a great race."
Lewis is in Osaka to support long jumper Dwight Phillips, who he represents. Lewis is also doing some work for TBS.
The 46-year-old Lewis had an incredible showing in Tokyo around this time 16 years ago. He beat Leroy Burrell in the finals of the 100 with what was then a world record time of 9.86 seconds. In the final, six of the runners went under 10 seconds.
He was also a part of one of the greatest long jumping showdowns ever to play out. Lewis lost to Mike Powell, who beat Bob Beamon's world record by leaping 8.95 meters (29 feet, 2 1/2 inches). The record still stands. Lewis jumped a wind-aided 8.91 (29-2 3/4) during the meet.
"I'm glad to be in Japan and hear people talk about Tokyo," said Lewis, who also helped the 400 relay to a gold medal in a then world record time.
Powell is in Osaka as well, serving as an ambassador for IAAF and coaching four jumpers. The two had a chance to reminisce before the championships began.
"It was good to talk to him," Powell said of their reunion.
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NO ROOMS: Sleepless in Osaka. That was the status of five athletes from Eritrea who arrived in Osaka to find they had no rooms. All five slept in a hotel lobby the first night. The second night, three found rooms and the two others shared with athletes from neighboring Djibouti for three more nights.
"It's true there were some unfortunate mix ups at the start of the championships with hotel accommodations," IAAF spokesman Nick Davies said. "However, I know for a fact these were sorted out in a couple of days. The information I've been given is that all team delegates do have accommodations."
Davies said athletes and team members are taking up about 3,500 beds in Osaka during the nine-day championships.
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IN TEARS: Russian pole vaulter Tatyana Polnova was still crying for an hour after it happened.
In Tuesday's pole-vault final, Polnova thought she had cleared 4.65 meters. On her jump, the bar bounced on the pegs but didn't fall. She jumped out of the landing area to celebrate. However, it was ruled _ though the bar did not fall _ it was resting on only one of the pegs _ the other end of the bar resting on a metal portion of the structure.
Polnova did not file a protest and was allowed to view the tape afterward.
"It wasn't resting on the pegs, it was resting on a peg, and on the upright," IAAF spokesman Nick Davies explained. "When you looked at the video evidence, and when the athletes were shown the video evidence _ they had to accept that if you take an absolutely strict interpretation it was not on both pegs."
World record holder Yelena Isinbayeva won the pole vault at 4.80. Katerina Badurova was second and Svetlana Feofanova was third _ both at 4.75.
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HAIR APPARENT: U.S. sprinter Sanya Richards literally let her hair down for the world championships.
Instead of pulling it back, she's gone with the curly look.
"My sister, Shari, is a hair stylist," she said. "She's always changing it up for me."
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AROUND THE TRACK: IAAF officials reported that all the drug tests taken from athletes on Saturday have come back negative. It takes up to 48 hours for a test to come back. ... Elio Locatelli, who analyzes the biomechanics of runners for the IAAF, said Gay took 44.5 strides to win the 100 on Sunday night. Asafa Powell needed 45.4 strides when he set his first world record in 2005.


Updated : 2021-03-01 22:09 GMT+08:00