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Germany's Merkel arrives in Japan for talks with PM on climate change

Germany's Merkel arrives in Japan for talks with PM on climate change

German Chancellor Angela Merkel met with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe on Wednesday, beginning a visit to Japan to discuss climate change and other key global issues with government and business leaders.
Reflecting the focus on global warming, Merkel and Abe went into their talks pointing out that no one in their delegations was wearing a tie, in honor of Japan's "cool biz" campaign to dress lighter in summer and reduce air conditioning use.
The two leaders planned to map out ways to work with major emitters to achieve goals for greenhouse gas reduction and discuss international efforts against terrorism, Foreign Ministry official Tatsuya Machida said.
Merkel arrived in Japan earlier Wednesday after a four-day visit to China, where she raised human rights issues along with trade, environmental protection and China's rampant copyright piracy during talks with Chinese President Hu Jintao and Premier Wen Jiabao.
While in Japan, Merkel also is to visit Kyoto, where the current protocol limiting greenhouse gas emissions was negotiated 10 years ago _ underlining her push for a new global agreement to combat climate change when that pact expires in 2012.
Merkel, whose country holds the presidency of the Group of Eight industrialized nations, has been lobbying for the accord, which nations are to begin negotiating at U.N.-sponsored talks in December. Japan will chair the G-8 next year.
At the German-hosted G-8 summit in June, leaders agreed to "seriously consider" proposals to cut emissions of greenhouse gases by 50 percent by 2050 _ nonbinding language that was a compromise between the EU, which wants mandatory cuts, and the U.S., which opposes them.
Japan has announced an "Abe Initiative" of short- and long-term goals to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and is also calling for a new global warming pact to succeed the 1997 Kyoto Protocol.
The United States, a leading emitter of such gases, and Australia, the worst greenhouse-gas polluter per capita, have rejected the Kyoto agreement, saying it would hurt their economies.


Updated : 2021-09-22 01:11 GMT+08:00