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Scholars worry Taiwan losing its edge

Scholars worry Taiwan losing its edge

A group of scholars at a forum yesterday urged the government to improve its effectiveness so as to further boost Taiwan's international competitiveness.
"Taiwan has a strong competitive edge in the civil and private sectors, however, the administration's governing skills are ineffective in comparison to private industries," Chu Yun-peng (朱雲鵬), professor in the Department of Economics of National Central University said at a forum on the country's ability to compete in the global market.
Chu pointed out that, according to the Global Competitiveness Report released by the World Economic Forum, Taiwan has strong innovation ability, especially in information technology trade.
"That is why the nation can sell IT products worldwide," he noted.
"Nonetheless, Taiwan performed badly in the area of public institutions, which means that Taiwan's democratic, law enforcement and administrative systems are weak," Chu added.
Since Taiwan is weak in these areas, the government should reinforce its exiting advantage to keep talented Taiwanese from leaving the island, he argued.
Associate professor Thomas Peng (彭錦鵬) from the National Taiwan University's Department of Political Science also expressed similar views, citing World Bank Governance Matters 2007.
"Taiwan performed poorly in several sectors of the Worldwide Governance Indicators, ranging from government effectiveness, control of corruption, and political stability. The greatest risk for the country is if the government does not function according to the Constitution," Peng said.
"No matter which party wins the 2008 presidential election, the crucial problem they will need to consider is whether or not they are ready to run the government" and how they can improve efficiency to boost Taiwan's global competitiveness, Peng said.
The participants at the forum also offered suggestions on what is required of the Democratic Progressive Party and Kuomintang's presidential candidates to enhance the nation's competitiveness.
"The future president should be a visionary with a global perspective who can think positively and adopt high-technology and creativity to run the government. The president doesn't have to 'stay put' in any one place, he should perform duties in different cities and counties so that he could learn what really happens locally," the convener of the forum Lin Chien-fu said.
Peng also spotlighted the issues that he said each of the presidential candidates needed to address.
"To win the election, Hsieh needs to convince that public that he has a clean-handed team, while Ma owes an explanation to Taiwanese people on his ideas regarding the current status and position of the Republic of China," Peng said.


Updated : 2021-03-03 13:47 GMT+08:00