Alexa

Slow balls, fast court _ and Lopez _ send Ferrero home again

Slow balls, fast court _ and Lopez _ send Ferrero home again

A slow ball, a fast court _ and Feliciano Lopez _ were too much for Juan Carlos Ferrero.
The Spaniard was the first seeded player to get upset in either the men's or women's bracket at the U.S. Open on Monday, sent home from the first round at Flushing for the second time in three years.
While unable to fault the near perfect weather, the 21st-seeded Ferrero didn't like the balls, or the courts.
"I like to hit with a lot of topspin, but with these balls, they're like dead balls," the 27-year-old Ferrero said.
The balls _ Wilson U.S. Open Extra Duty _ have been the same balls used at the American championship since 1995. The women have used Wilson's Regular Duty balls. The difference is a slightly heavier felt between the Extra Duty and Regular Duty.
Ferrero credited Lopez for playing better and winning in one hour, 43 minutes, but also said the courts played quicker than he expected.
"Feliciano served very well," Ferrero said. "The surface was faster than normal."
U.S. Open officials say they resurface the courts, including No. 8 where Ferrero lost, every year for the tournament.
The winner of the French Open in 2003 _ the same year he reached No. 1 in the ATP rankings, has not won a tournament in four years, and not advanced past the second round at the U.S. Open since a runner-up finish the same year he won at Roland Garros.
He's made only one final this year, in February at Costa do Sauipe, Brazil, but has seen his rank climb two spots since January to 21st.
"The ball keeps rolling," he said.
For Ferrero, it won't roll for at least three weeks, while he takes a vacation before returning to the tour _ somewhere indoors.